Norwegian cities to introduce restricted parking / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian cities to introduce restricted parking. Company employees in Stavanger, Sandnes, Kristiansand, Drammen, and Trondheim will soon have to prove they cannot get to work without their car. Requirement-based parking is soon to be introduced, meaning it will be getting out of the car and ‘on your bike’ for many. “It is possible to walk or cycle if you live five kilometres away from work. Alternatively, you can use public transport if you live in an area with an adequate service,” Professor Tor Medalen at NTNU’s (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Department of Urban Design and Planning tells Dagsavisen.

transnova, ntnu, norwegian, university, science, technology, tor, medalen, bicycle, bus, transport, co2, climate, environment, parking, stavanger, sandnes, kristiansand, drammen, trondheim



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Norwegian cities to introduce restricted parking

Published on Thursday, 23rd September, 2010 at 13:33 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Company employees in Stavanger, Sandnes, Kristiansand, Drammen, and Trondheim will soon have to prove they cannot get to work without their car.

The old new bicycle from Canadian Tire (illus. photo)
The old new bicycle from Canadian Tire (illus. photo)
Photo: Erle/Picasaweb


Requirement-based parking is soon to be introduced, meaning it will be getting out of the car and ‘on your bike’ for many.

“It is possible to walk or cycle if you live five kilometres away from work. Alternatively, you can use public transport if you live in an area with an adequate service,” Professor Tor Medalen at NTNU’s (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Department of Urban Design and Planning tells Dagsavisen.

The five cities have agreed to be guinea pigs for the university’s scheme funded by Transnova, a state-owned project tasked with supporting climate-friendly transport solutions, as part of efforts to reduce CO2 emissions.

Medalen agrees the scheme may not be particularly popular, but argues increasing traffic chaos and the possibility of choked roads means some measures are necessary now.

“The private car is almost a sacred cow. I was at an NTNU meeting a couple of years ago where a professor announced she would be moving back to where she had studied in the US if her parking space was taken away,” he says.

However, he admits nobody can decide how far away people should live before they qualify for using their car to get to work.

“It is a little too early to say, though we have thought about it. Traditionally, an adequate public transport service means two buses per hour if you live 500-600 metres away from the bus stop. However, many people think a good service means no less than four buses per hour,” Medalen says.

Do you agree or oppose the trial project? Discuss it on The Foreigner’s forum.




Published on Thursday, 23rd September, 2010 at 13:33 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: transnova, ntnu, norwegian, university, science, technology, tor, medalen, bicycle, bus, transport, co2, climate, environment, parking, stavanger, sandnes, kristiansand, drammen, trondheim.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!