Norwegian company aims to end water scarcity / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian company aims to end water scarcity. Every drop can be used at least twice with this water treatment barge, the firm says. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti launched his “Save the drop” conservation campaign after years of drought in the area. A Norwegian entrepreneur was recently on broadcaster TV2 offering his help. Sigmund “Siggy” Larsen’s startup, EnviroNor, uses water-processing technology to convert secondhand oil barges into floating desalination and wastewater treatment plants. According the initiative’s founder and CEO, floating treatment plants would be a cheaper way to purify water, particularly in regions threatened by water scarcity and where land for desalination is lacking.

water, environment, recyling, norway



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Norwegian company aims to end water scarcity

Published on Thursday, 30th April, 2015 at 09:53 under the news category, by Rasmus Falck.

Every drop can be used at least twice with this water treatment barge, the firm says.

The vessel and its technology
EnviroNor’s ships would turn wastewater into clean water for industry or irrigation.The vessel and its technology
Photo: EnviroNor.com



Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti launched his “Save the drop” conservation campaign after years of drought in the area. A Norwegian entrepreneur was recently on broadcaster TV2 offering his help.

Sigmund “Siggy” Larsen’s startup, EnviroNor, uses water-processing technology to convert secondhand oil barges into floating desalination and wastewater treatment plants. According the initiative’s founder and CEO, floating treatment plants would be a cheaper way to purify water, particularly in regions threatened by water scarcity and where land for desalination is lacking.

It’s cheaper to convert a ship into a desalination or wastewater treatment plant than to do it onshore. The planning process in most countries is significantly shorter for offshore infrastructure, according to Siggy. His venture combines Norwegian maritime and oil and gas know-how with Israeli proficiency in desalination and wastewater technologies.

The ships can hold facilities capable of purifying wastewater, which could accommodate about 2.5 million people. Using old ships brings another environmental advantage: the life of a ship can be extended from 25 years to 60 years. The floating facilities do require energy to operate, but a portion of the activity of the wastewater treatment plants can be driven by biogas collected from the wastewater purification process.

“Siggy” founded EnviroNor in 2011. He is an entrepreneur and a business and shipping executive from Norway with over 30 years of maritime industry experience. A long-time champion of sustainable practices and of corporate social responsibility, he has a genuine enthusiasm for creating a paradigm shift on how to solve the present and future challenges related to water.

He is also eager to share his knowledge with others. He created the concept and idea that formed the basis of the startup to promote the use of floating, offshore wastewater treatment and desalination solutions.

In 2013, he presented the project to DNV GL, the world’s leading classification society in the maritime industry, and also the leading technical advisor to the global oil and gas industry. DNV GL embraced the concept and established a project team to verify, prove, and enhance it. They launched the concept together a year ago. Now they offer clients a two-stage consultation and facility study.

The World Wide Fund for Nature and the Norwegian Red Cross have become partners. Innovation Norway is involved financially. They are the Norwegian Government’s instrument for innovation and development of Norwegian enterprises, and help lay the foundation for new and successful business endeavors.

The company’s slogan is that every drop can be used at least twice. TV2’s reporter was also seen drinking the water.

This article originally appeared in the May 01, 2015 issue of the Norwegian American Weekly. Click here to subscribe.



Published on Thursday, 30th April, 2015 at 09:53 under the news category, by Rasmus Falck.

This post has the following tags: water, environment, recyling, norway.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!