Norwegian election researcher predicts higher turnout / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian election researcher predicts higher turnout. Norway’s local election campaign began in earnest, Monday, against the backdrop of Anders Behring Breivik’s twin massacres, but his acts of terror have only encouraged the voter numbers, according to a leading election researcher. Professor Frank Aarebrot at the University of Bergen tells The Foreigner whilst voter participation was pegged at 61.4 percent four years ago, he expects 70 percent will go to the urns next month. “Quite a few polls now show Labour (Ap) is gaining somewhat, with a trend also suggesting an increased turnout,” he says.

andersbehringbreivik, norwegianlocalelectioncampaign, utoeyashootings, oslobombing, jensstoltenberg



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Norwegian election researcher predicts higher turnout

Published on Monday, 15th August, 2011 at 19:44 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Norway’s local election campaign began in earnest, Monday, against the backdrop of Anders Behring Breivik’s twin massacres, but his acts of terror have only encouraged the voter numbers, according to a leading election researcher.

Professor Frank Aarebrot
Professor Frank Aarebrot
Photo: © 2009 Jarle Vines CCAS 3.0


Professor Frank Aarebrot at the University of Bergen tells The Foreigner whilst voter participation was pegged at 61.4 percent four years ago, he expects 70 percent will go to the urns next month.

“Quite a few polls now show Labour (Ap) is gaining somewhat, with a trend also suggesting an increased turnout,” he says.

According to him, the Prime Minister’s Party has moved the voters off the sofa into the polling booths.

“Labour has gained more than the others, five percent locally, because of events of 22 July and the ‘[Jens] Stoltenberg effect.”

To the Right, however, the Conservatives’ (H) popularity is slightly reduced in relation to the other Parties “because these mobilised their voters and had more substantial electoral reserves before Breivik’s attacks”, argues the researcher.

The Progress Party (FrP) looks to be worst off, however.

“It’s the only Party not mobilising its voters now. Progress also had more ‘don’t knows’, meaning its net loss is higher.”

He thinks the assaults have also dampened otherwise traditionally more offensive electioneering by all.

“The issues will probably be the same as before Breivik struck, but I believe health and welfare – schools, hospitals, and elderly care – will be talked about in more of a toned-down manner. Immigration and integration will be less hot subjects than usual.”

“Any criticism this year will be directed towards specific policies, and the patter will be more reminiscent of a marketing campaign. There are other ways to sell a Mercedes than say that a BMW is a bad car,” concludes Professor Aarebrot.




Published on Monday, 15th August, 2011 at 19:44 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: andersbehringbreivik, norwegianlocalelectioncampaign, utoeyashootings, oslobombing, jensstoltenberg.





  
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