Norwegian envelopes end / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian envelopes end. The very last envelopes produced in Norway rolled off Bong’s assembly line in eastern Norway, Friday, bringing some 116 years of production to a close. The envelopes from Vestfold County were originally manufactured by company Tønsberg Paper Industry, established in 1898. Norwegians used the envelopes when they voted in favor of independence from Sweden in 1905.       There were 30 envelope machines and 6 bag machines in operation then, with a mainly female labor force of 140. 600,000 brown ballot envelopes were manufactured and delivered in two to three days.

envelopes, wwii, norway, wwi, sweden



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Norwegian envelopes end

Published on Sunday, 2nd November, 2014 at 08:51 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.
Last Updated on 2nd November 2014 at 09:10.

The very last envelopes produced in Norway rolled off Bong’s assembly line in eastern Norway, Friday, bringing some 116 years of production to a close.

Envelope/stamp
Norwegian WWII envelopes had stamps with messages to the Germans like "We will win" or "Front fighters". Forced into exile, the government decided to issue its own stamps. The result was the legendary London Edition.Envelope/stamp
Photo: Tove Andersson


The envelopes from Vestfold County were originally manufactured by company Tønsberg Paper Industry, established in 1898. Norwegians used the envelopes when they voted in favor of independence from Sweden in 1905.      

There were 30 envelope machines and 6 bag machines in operation then, with a mainly female labor force of 140. 600,000 brown ballot envelopes were manufactured and delivered in two to three days.

War in 1914 led to two spontaneous demands for bags and envelopes. 1920: the company is as big as all of Sweden’s and Denmark’s envelope factories combined.

Tønsberg Paper Industry’s history then took what might be regarded as a slightly ironic turn.

83 years following the 1905 dissolution of the union between both Scandinavian countries, Swedish company Bong Ljungdahl AB, located in southern Sweden’s Kristianstad, bought the company up.

Bong Ljungdah’s envelopes were produced on paper with the Svanemerke label.  The swan is the official Nordic Ecolabel, established by the Nordic Council of Ministers.

More than 5,000 products and services in Norway bear this distinctive label. Requirements have also been developed for printing, cleaning services, laundries, dry cleaners, and restaurants, as well as a variety of products from detergents to toys.

“The machines here are creasing and gluing 850 envelopes per minute. Not one drop of glue must end up in the wrong place,” head of sales at Bong Ljungdahl, Stig Hjelseth told publication Tønsberg Blad.

But the Swedes determined that the production of envelopes in Norway was too expensive, however. According to Mr. Hjelseth, turnover has declined from NOK 150 million to 100 million.

The last years have seen annual staff reductions of between 15 and 20 people, with annual envelope production decreasing from 1.5 billion to 650 million. With an overproduction of envelopes, manufacturing is now being moved to Sweden.

“80 percent of it [our turnover] comes from our new products such as wrapping paper and bags”, said Mr. Hjelseth.

Bong Ljungdahl’s envelope production was located at Vear, a village with close to 4,000 residents. One-third of them live in Tønsberg municipality, the rest reside in Stokke municipality.




Published on Sunday, 2nd November, 2014 at 08:51 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.
Last updated on 2nd November 2014 at 09:10.

This post has the following tags: envelopes, wwii, norway, wwi, sweden.





  
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