Norwegian firm offers bizarre items for sale / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian firm offers bizarre items for sale. Forget the solitary head on the wall after a successful hunting expedition, here is the chance to do one better. Southern Norway-based company Naturexpo in Kristiansand are now selling eight, whole stuffed moose for interested buyers. The largest costs 119,000 kroner (some 19,870 US dollars/14,320 euro/11,880 pounds sterling at today’s ROE), with others between the 24,000 and 99,000 kroner mark.

moose, norwayhunting



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Norwegian firm offers bizarre items for sale

Published on Monday, 10th March, 2014 at 06:30 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last Updated on 10th March 2014 at 07:09.

Forget the solitary head on the wall after a successful hunting expedition, here is the chance to do one better.

A moose
A moose
Photo: From Naturexpo's Facebook page


Southern Norway-based company Naturexpo in Kristiansand are now selling eight, whole stuffed moose for interested buyers.

The largest costs 119,000 kroner (some 19,870 US dollars/14,320 euro/11,880 pounds sterling at today’s ROE), with others between the 24,000 and 99,000 kroner mark.

They are listed under the ‘art’ heading on Norway classifieds site finn.no.

Naturexpo’s Jarle Thorkildsen states “they are well worth it”.

“I don’t think it makes sense to sell these under categories such as ‘ornaments’ or ‘collectibles’, so it had to be ‘art’,” Mr Thorkildsen tells NRK.

Describing their business sector, the Norwegian taxidermy company says they “take care of everything from the smallest preparation assignments at one end of the scale, to concept development and realisation of all attractions at the other.”

“Modern taxidermy is NOT the same as earlier taxidermy, but a process which starts with the respectful treatment of leather, horn, and other things suited for preparation and that can be used in a montage. This rendition combines a variety of crafts and requires considerable knowledge of animal anatomy, their habitats, and their way of life to be able to recreate the animal's character. A good installation gives everyone a great opportunity to study wild birds and animals up close.”

Taxidermy has become a hobby amongst collectors who will usually search antique stores and online sites in the hunt for these mounted creatures for their unique characteristics.

The discipline has become a growing interest for many customers, whether it is from a young age where they first encounter a stuffed and mounted creature in the classroom or later at a local antique store.

People are willing to pay an exorbitant amount, it seems. These mounted animals can easily be found online, selling for a select price.

Moreover, animal-lovers can also pay for taxidermy services to have their beloved pets stuffed. The price for a large dog can commonly cost around 1,200 pounds sterling.

Taxidermy, which might seem bizarre to some, is the art of preparing, stuffing and mounting the skins of animals for display or study. These can vary in both sizes and species range, such as amphibians, mammals, birds, reptiles and fish.

The ancient techniques of preserving animals and humans were often associated with religious ceremonies. Preserved body parts were linked to the after world and revered as symbols of strength and worldly representations.

Porcupines’, eagles’, and foxes’ heads were used as decoration for clothing and equipment by some North American First Nations peoples.

Anthropomorphic taxidermy grew in popularity in the late 19th Century. This is where animals were dressed as people and displayed in a way to show human characteristics. Taxidermy in this Victorian era also became a popular part of interior design and decor.

More recent examples of using animals for fashion include a pair of boots made from a horse’s lower legs designed by German designer Iris Schieferstein. Risto Todoroski from Australia designed his own goat bagpipes.




Published on Monday, 10th March, 2014 at 06:30 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last updated on 10th March 2014 at 07:09.

This post has the following tags: moose, norwayhunting.





  
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