Norwegian-French fish eating habits near parity / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian-French fish eating habits near parity. Norway’s sushi-lovers eat the Japanese dish almost as often as their French dining peers, the Norwegian Seafood Council reports. Almost NOK 600 million (about EUR 78.66 million) was spent last year in the Scandinavian country’s restaurants and shops. “Catching up” The Council’s figures also show 2012’s sales of pre-packed sushi on a tray available in shops and at fuel service stations were NOK 189 million (some EUR 24.78 million). This is a 28 per cent year-on-year increase.

norwaysushi, norwayfishexports



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Norwegian-French fish eating habits near parity

Published on Monday, 6th May, 2013 at 14:40 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 6th May 2013 at 21:26.

Norway’s sushi-lovers eat the Japanese dish almost as often as their French dining peers, the Norwegian Seafood Council reports.

Sushi
Sushi
Photo: Gladmat


Almost NOK 600 million (about EUR 78.66 million) was spent last year in the Scandinavian country’s restaurants and shops.

“Catching up”

The Council’s figures also show 2012’s sales of pre-packed sushi on a tray available in shops and at fuel service stations were NOK 189 million (some EUR 24.78 million). This is a 28 per cent year-on-year increase.

Head of marketing Lisbeth Bjørvig Hansen declares this serving form for meetings, trains, or automobile munching has made it appetising for all.

“This is what has contributed most to Norwegians eating increasing amounts of fish on rice. The next big wave will certainly be home-made sushi,” she says.

Three of ten Norwegians answer when surveyed that they eat sushi at least two to three times a month. This is almost as much as France’s four in ten in the same time-period, the Council reports.

“A few years ago, catering companies in France had more home deliveries of sushi than pizza. We’re now about to catch them up,” says Ms Bjørvig Hansen.

There are also more sushi bars and restaurants in Norway, about 15 a year since 2005, with several in the country’s big four cities of Oslo, Bergen, Stavanger, and Trondheim. At least six places in Norway’s fifth-largest city, Kristiansand, serve sushi too.

Not such a catch

The Seafood Council also says April was a record month for fish and seafood exports globally. Norway sent NOK 4.4 billion (about EUR 577.14 million) of them, a 22 per cent increase on the same month last year.

On a European level, Norwegian-produced salmon sales were strongest to France and Poland. Trout was extremely popular in Russia and Belarus.

The Ukraine’s appetite for Norwegian mackerel was also fairly good, with Germany and Russia liking herring.

At the same time, general fish exports were down in France and Denmark, and volumes to Eastern Europe in the same month also showed a decline.

This is mainly because of a 20 per cent reduction of exports to Russia, the Seafood Council says.




Published on Monday, 6th May, 2013 at 14:40 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 6th May 2013 at 21:26.

This post has the following tags: norwaysushi, norwayfishexports.





  
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