Norwegian fur industry wilder than the animals / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian fur industry wilder than the animals. Politicians are debating whether to cut financial support to the fur industry after the media has received footage of severely injured and confined minks and foxes. Two animal rights organisations, the Network for Animal Freedom (Nettverk for dyrs frihet) and the Norwegian Society for the Protection of Animals (Dyrebeskyttelsen/NSPA), claim to have filmed the shocking videos this year, showing animals in cramped spaces delimited by wire fences on 39 farms all over Norway. The over 800 hours of video contained images of animals with open wounds, cut off legs, ears, tails, and even dead animals kept in the same cages with healthy ones, reports NRK,.

mink, fox, norwegian, fur, trade, breeders, cruelty, animals, society, protection, network, terje, fjeldaas, hans, petter, bugge, bertran, trane, skadsem, lars, peder, brekk, odd, harald, eidsmo



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Norwegian fur industry wilder than the animals

Published on Wednesday, 3rd November, 2010 at 09:03 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 15th November 2010 at 14:01.

Politicians are debating whether to cut financial support to the fur industry after the media has received footage of severely injured and confined minks and foxes.

Mink at a Norwegian fur farm
Mink at a Norwegian fur farm
Photo: NSPA/Flickr


Long-term cruelty

Two animal rights organisations, the Network for Animal Freedom (Nettverk for dyrs frihet) and the Norwegian Society for the Protection of Animals (Dyrebeskyttelsen/NSPA), claim to have filmed the shocking videos this year, showing animals in cramped spaces delimited by wire fences on 39 farms all over Norway.

The over 800 hours of video contained images of animals with open wounds, cut off legs, ears, tails, and even dead animals kept in the same cages with healthy ones, reports NRK,.

Terje Fjeldaas, associate professor in the Department of Production Animal Clinical Sciences at the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science (Norsk veterinærhøgskole), claims some animals should have been separated and given  special treatment, while others would have suffered less if they were killed.

“There are many indications there have been symptoms over a relatively long time. It should have been discovered earlier, and something should have been done about it,” he said he was shown footages earlier this week.

Flawed inspections

The Food and Safety Authority (Mattilsynet), in charge of monitoring the fur farms’ activities, has inspected 101 farms so far this year, imposing 84 compulsory improvement directives. It says all inspections except six were notified in advance.

However, Secretary General of the Norwegian Veterinary Association (Den norske veterinærforening) Hans Petter Bugge questions the efficiency of the inspections, reports Dagbladet.

“To see half-eaten animals jump around in their cages is too awful. If how they conduct evaluations does not prevent such things from happening, then one must ask whether their methods are good enough.”

Misleading

Fur industry representatives claim the images shown in the footages refer to individual cases and do not offer an accurate impression.

“This is a completely distorted picture compared to the rest of Norway’s fur industry. We have flexible cage systems for foxes and climbing cages for mink. Consequently, we are looking at different objects contiually that can be used to give the animals some activity. These are important measures for their welfare,” said Gorm Sanson, a vet in the Norwegian Fur Breeders’ Association, which represents 350 farms, told NRK.

According to Dagbladet, association leader Bertran Trane Skadsem expressed his criticism towards animal rights groups

“I will not comment on individual cases. We have no guarantee the situation is how these people portray it to be.”

“This is [just] a small part of the Norwegian population committing criminal acts against the industry. They break in during the middle of the night, take the media with them, and scare the animals,” he told NRK.

Governmental division

Meanwhile, the Centre Party’s (Sp) Agriculture Minister, Lars Peder Brekk, said last year the fur trade had to improve, or funding would be withdrawn. The government gave the business over 40 million kroner in 2009.

14 months later, Minister Brekk is still critical to the industry’s apparent lack of unified action, saying, “[it] is not good enough. I have the impression the industry has been working to clean up but some producers are still unable to follow the laws and regulations and we cannot accept this.”

Nevertheless, it now looks as though Sp is the only Party, not including minor support from the Christian Democrats (KrF) who is in favour of continued funding.

Animal rights representatives say that they only want to inform the authorities of the fur industry’s practices, however.

“Our aim is to visit fur farms, document conditions, and bring the evidence back to the authorities about how daily life is [there],” said NSPA information manager Odd Harald Eidsmo.





Published on Wednesday, 3rd November, 2010 at 09:03 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 15th November 2010 at 14:01.

This post has the following tags: mink, fox, norwegian, fur, trade, breeders, cruelty, animals, society, protection, network, terje, fjeldaas, hans, petter, bugge, bertran, trane, skadsem, lars, peder, brekk, odd, harald, eidsmo.





  
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