Norwegian papers split over Kate and Diana / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian papers split over Kate and Diana. UPDATED: Royal Families are celebrating the marriage of the Duke of Cambrigde Prince William, and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, but Norway’s media cannot make up its mind about whether Kate Middleton is the new Princess Diana. 25-page special paper edition Dagbladet alleges she is, VG, with a retired Norwegian royal expert commentator and 10 pages, claims she is not. British columnist Mark Lewis sums up his view of both papers’ articles for The Foreigner: Norwegians have not been this crazy about British Royals since The Queen Mother cracked open a bottle of gin at Olav and Marthe’s silver wedding anniversary in 1953.

princewilliam, catherinemiddleton, britishroyalwedding, westminsterabbey



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Norwegian papers split over Kate and Diana

Published on Friday, 29th April, 2011 at 11:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Mark Lewis   .
Last Updated on 29th April 2011 at 16:49.

UPDATED: Royal Families are celebrating the marriage of the Duke of Cambrigde Prince William, and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, but Norway’s media cannot make up its mind about whether Kate Middleton is the new Princess Diana.

Prince William and Miss Catherine Middleton
Prince William and Miss Catherine Middleton
Photo: Samir Hussein/Wire Image


25-page special paper edition Dagbladet alleges she is, VG, with a retired Norwegian royal expert commentator and 10 pages, claims she is not. British columnist Mark Lewis sums up his view of both papers’ articles for The Foreigner:

Norwegians have not been this crazy about British Royals since The Queen Mother cracked open a bottle of gin at Olav and Marthe’s silver wedding anniversary in 1953.

But so plentiful are the pictures of Kate and Wills on the websites of Norway’s biggest newspapers that they risk bursting out of the side of your computer monitor and spilling commemorative mugs and bunting all over your functional Scandinavian desks.

Dagbladet and VG agree that you cannot have too many images of the pair on your site, and the pictures cannot be too big. But the two papers differ on how prominently to use their picture of David Beckham. Dagbladet has decided to put the former England football captain right at the top, just under a picture of lovely Kate, Wills, Harry, and some other bloke – probably Kate’s dad.

VG has decided to put him lower down the screen, but managed to squeeze in an image of his scowling wife, looking anything but Posh alongside Britain’s proper hoity-toity, as well as putting a ring around his OBE, which he is apparently wearing on the wrong lapel. So honors even there – so to speak.

But what the Norwegian papers simply cannot decide is just how much like Wills’ mum, Diana, Kate is likely to become. In a family of Royals whose gene pool is about as diverse as an Icelandic colony of cheetahs, it would hardly be a surprise if they sought out partners not unlike their own relatives.

However, this is where the papers depart. Kate, of course, is hardly family. She is famously more common than an Essex dustman – coming from a school which you only need mortgage one of your stately homes to attend. She is also the progeny of a family of folk who have [gasp] done some work for a living.

This is enough for Royal author, Claudia Joseph to declare in VG: “Kate and Diana are very unalike; they come from totally different backgrounds.

“Diana lived in a very protected environment before she married Charles. Kate stands for something, and seems more confident,” says NTB’s retired royal reporter of 24 years Wibeche Lie.

Quite what Kate stands for is not properly explored: uppity upper middle class upstarts? Lovely dresses? Being just like their deceased mother-in-laws?

Who knows? Dagbladet does: “She’s just like her deceased mother-in-law,” it says. Diana’s Princess of Hearts role has been inherited: “She has already taken aim at filling some of the void among the British people. She has, like her deceased mother-in-law, involved herself in a number of charitable activities. And together with her husband, William, she has taken a completely different and more modern relationship with the people and the media than the Queen - who has never in her whole life given a single interview.”

Maybe it is better that way. Who knows what the Queen would have to say. Perhaps she would reveal that Maud, the English princess who, in 1905, became the Queen of Norway, was a right old slapper. And Norway’s biggest papers would have an excuse to splash the royalty all over their front pages all over again.

Mark Lewis is an English journalist based in Norway. He writes for The Evening Standard, The Observer, the Sunday Telegraph, and too many trade magazines to mention.



Published on Friday, 29th April, 2011 at 11:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Mark Lewis   .
Last updated on 29th April 2011 at 16:49.

This post has the following tags: princewilliam, catherinemiddleton, britishroyalwedding, westminsterabbey.


You might also be interested in...

 
UK royal birth ends in fine for Norway man




  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!