Norwegian PM rallies to rape victims / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian PM rallies to rape victims. Top politicians have engaged themselves in fighting Oslo’s alarming increase in rapes following a wave of attacks in the capital. Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is in Copenhagen today meeting with Mayor Frank Jensen and police top dog Johan Martini Reimann to look at how the Danes have succeeded in battling the problem. Options under consideration are increased city centre and bus stop security camera surveillance, more night routes on public transport, more police on the streets, and improved lighting in problem areas.

oslorapes, oslomurders, jensstoltenberg, knutstorberget, norwayasylumseekers



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Norwegian PM rallies to rape victims

Published on Tuesday, 1st November, 2011 at 14:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and John Price      .
Last Updated on 1st November 2011 at 15:09.

Top politicians have engaged themselves in fighting Oslo’s alarming increase in rapes following a wave of attacks in the capital.

Oslo skyline
Oslo skyline
Photo: Inez Dawczyk/The Foreigner


Useless

Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is in Copenhagen today meeting with Mayor Frank Jensen and police top dog Johan Martini Reimann to look at how the Danes have succeeded in battling the problem.

Options under consideration are increased city centre and bus stop security camera surveillance, more night routes on public transport, more police on the streets, and improved lighting in problem areas.

“The current situation in Oslo is completely unacceptable. CCTV is used more in Copenhagen than in Oslo. Surveillance at bus stops and other public transport hubs could be controversial measures, but sometimes one has to admit one is facing a dilemma,” he tells NRK.

Whilst rape figures in the other Scandinavian capitals are declining, Oslo has seen approximately 50 assault rape cases in the past year. Reported rapes have increased by 84 percent since 2001, and there have been 929 in Norway on a national basis in 2011 so far.

On Saturday, women marched through the streets of Oslo in a torch lit demonstration against rape called “Ta natten tilbake” (Take back the night), protesting about their lack of safety.

Police also deployed 20 extra officers at the weekend. Nevertheless, six new attacks, two of them without consent had been reported by Monday.

One woman in her 20s was raped at an apartment in Sandaker early on Saturday morning, after meeting a man on the Internet then voluntarily accompanying him home. The man, who is also in his 20s, was indicted and then released.

On Saturday evening, two 16-year-old girls reported two men raped them at Oslo S train station. Five males aged 16 to 20 were arrested on Saturday evening.

In other incidents, two men attacked and raped an 18-year-old woman in Vaterlandsparken early on Sunday morning near the Oslo Plaza hotel in Grønland in the city centre. The sixth victim, in her 20s, reported a person had tried to force her to give oral sex in a pirate taxi in nedre Grünerløkka.

Foreign problem?

The identities and ethnic origins of the Vaterlanspark attackers are still unknown, but police say foreigners committed at least two of the weekend’s attacks.

The Bislet rapists were born in Sri Lanka and Iran. Those arrested for the Oslo S rapes are from Afghanistan and Pakistan, and the pirate taxi assailant is believed to be a Somali. Moreover, it is suspected foreigners committed 45 of the 48 assault rapes so far this year.

Norwegian-Somali Kadra Yusuf says her foreign roots make her feel very uneasy about the situation.

“I would far rather walk behind an “Ola” than and “Ahmed” if I’m on my way home late at night. I find saying this makes me feel extremely uncomfortable because I have brothers and friends who are dark-skinned, but it has become part of Oslo’s reality.”

Citing Norway as “the land of equality”, she believes “it’s time to sit down and say ‘ok’, we need harder punishments, more information campaigns, and asylum seekers should simply lose the right to be in the country if it’s true that they are the ones who carry out rapes.”

Asylum seekers have also been in politicians’ spotlight over the past few days. Conservative Party (H) Mayor of Oslo Fabian Stang said to NRK, “I’m afraid the time is ripe to consider a way of limiting [asylum seekers’] freedom, even though I find this difficult.”

“It seems we have a big problem regarding assault rapes and asylum seekers. Not putting somebody in jail before they have committed a crime is an important principle and we must not stigmatise certain groups, but at the same time, I feel the women are paying the price for these principles, and I think we should be able to discuss whether this is right.”

Police and immigration authorities have criticised Mr Stang for his statements. Saying that just because police figures “show the majority of assailants are described as non-Nordic doesn’t mean they are asylum seeker,” Directorate of Immigration (UDI) Director Ida Børresen warns against grouping criminals and refugees together.

“Assault rapes are abominable crimes that must be combated. Nevertheless, means and measures must be targeted. Such drastic measures will affect a large group andthat may not help the problem.”

Reinforcements

The UDI already shows asylum seekers a two-minute animation film with a clear message that “rape is wrong”, and Stavanger police have reported success with their methods to reverse the trend.

Meanwhile, Oslo police argue “unfortunately, we cannot be everywhere at all times” National Criminal investigators (Kripos) have now been called in to help them. There are reports polices’ resources are already stretched following the recent spate of murders in the capital, and investigating Anders Behring Breivik’s massacres.

Minister of Justice Knut Storberget is now considering bringing in extra police from the districts.

The minister will be calling representatives from nearby districts, Kripos, and the Directorate of Police in for a meeting this week to look at possible methods.

“We can’t just sit and observe what is happening,” he says.




Published on Tuesday, 1st November, 2011 at 14:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and John Price      .
Last updated on 1st November 2011 at 15:09.

This post has the following tags: oslorapes, oslomurders, jensstoltenberg, knutstorberget, norwayasylumseekers.





  
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