Norwegian police armed response capabilities defective / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norwegian police armed response capabilities defective. Police in Norway fear they do not have sufficient combat skills when intervening in mass murders involving firearms. “We have to get education and training that makes us feel safe in such a dramatic situation to be able to do a good job,” senior police officer Bjørn Egeli at the Norwegian Police Service says to Aftenposten. Police have been severely criticised for their time keeping skills during last month’s massacre on Utøya Island, when Anders Breivik killed 69 political youth members.

utoeyashootings, policecriticism, andersbehringbreivik



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Norwegian police armed response capabilities defective

Published on Thursday, 11th August, 2011 at 19:44 under the news category, by John Price and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 31st August 2011 at 14:04.

Police in Norway fear they do not have sufficient combat skills when intervening in mass murders involving firearms.



“We have to get education and training that makes us feel safe in such a dramatic situation to be able to do a good job,” senior police officer Bjørn Egeli at the Norwegian Police Service says to Aftenposten.

Police have been severely criticised for their time keeping skills during last month’s massacre on Utøya Island, when Anders Breivik killed 69 political youth members.

Local officers used to be tasked with securing the area until two years ago, when it was subsequently decided they must intervene with armed mass murderers immediately.

Police weapons training courses using the relatively new “shooting in progress” tactic last 11 hours with a 40-hour annual certification programme.

The syllabus was inspired by Germany’s course, started after the 2002 Gutenberg-Gymnasium massacre in Erfurt, Thüringen. In 2009, the country also experienced a similar incident to Utøya’s when a gunman killed 15 students at a secondary school in Winnenden, Baden-Württemberg in southwestern Germany before turning the gun on himself.

Nevertheless, one teacher on the German programme, Reinhard Mussik, said that the police must consider their own safety as well as others’.

“The Erfurt case was reviewed at a seminar I attended recently. One of the policemen told me that the worst was having to sit outside and hear the screams without beingallowed to do anything."

“I understood the Utøya perpetrator had a large automatic weapon, meaning police probably had to wait for forces to arrive with more weapons anyway,” he concludes.



Published on Thursday, 11th August, 2011 at 19:44 under the news category, by John Price and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 31st August 2011 at 14:04.

This post has the following tags: utoeyashootings, policecriticism, andersbehringbreivik.





  
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