Norwegian police discount bomb warnings / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norwegian police discount bomb warnings. NEWS ROUNDUP: Police are confident that Anders Behring Breivik acted alone and are not treating further bomb threats as serious. Meanwhile public attention has turned to the police’s response to the killings. “We have received several bomb threats. They have all been unspecific,” said Johan Fredriksen, chief of staff of Oslo Police. “This means we have no information to start large operations. This is completely normal after these types of major incidents. There are many people out there who are influenced by news like this and want to create more fear.” Police are still looking for victims on Utøya, although the operation has already been scaled back. Following revision of casualty figures from 86 to 68, it is likely that this number will remain stable.

andersbehringbreivik, utoeyashootings, oslobombing, geirlippestad, jensstoltenberg



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Norwegian police discount bomb warnings

Published on Thursday, 28th July, 2011 at 18:29 under the news category, by Gareth Corfield.
Last Updated on 28th July 2011 at 21:34.

NEWS ROUNDUP: Police are confident that Anders Behring Breivik acted alone and are not treating further bomb threats as serious. Meanwhile public attention has turned to the police’s response to the killings.



“We have received several bomb threats. They have all been unspecific,” said Johan Fredriksen, chief of staff of Oslo Police. “This means we have no information to start large operations. This is completely normal after these types of major incidents. There are many people out there who are influenced by news like this and want to create more fear.”

Police are still looking for victims on Utøya, although the operation has already been scaled back. Following revision of casualty figures from 86 to 68, it is likely that this number will remain stable.

“We have people searching on Utøya island. The last I heard is that efforts will continue until Friday at two o’clock ... We think that the number of missing is now very few, but never stop searching as long as there is any hope of finding missing people in relation to these incidents,” said Fredriksen.

Commenting on Breivik’s manifesto claim that he was working with accomplices, police spokesman Henning Holtaas said: “We will check out information we have received over the last few days and continue questioning him about that.”

Travel restrictions imposed on Oslo city centre have since been lifted by the police, who want to it to “return to normality”.

Potentially insane      

Breivik’s lawyer, Geir Lippestad, has meanwhile said his client believes he is “in a war”.

“This whole case indicated that he is insane,” he told Sky News. “He says he is sorry that he had to do this, but that it was necessary to start a revolution in the Western world.”

Even the killer’s own lawyer seems resigned to Breivik being found guilty after he admitted responsibility for the Oslo bombs and the shootings. “If he does not accept the advice to plead insanity then he will have to look for another lawyer.”

Breivik has made a variety of demands since being remanded in custody at Ila prison, which was a Nazi concentration camp during World War II. As well as requesting a copy of his 1,500-page manifesto, he also asked for a non-Norwegian psychiatrist to assess his mental state and for a laptop computer so he could access the WikiLeaks website.

Breivik is currently in solitary confinement, with no access to the outside world except through his lawyer, who has reportedly visited him just three times.

Slow police response

Following Prime Minister Stoltenberg’s announcement of a public inquiry into Breivik’s bomb and gun spree, public attention has focused on the police’s response to the killings.

Critics have said that the police were too slow to arrive at Utøya, especially after it emerged that police were forced to commandeer two civilian boats after their own vessel had engine trouble. It took an hour for the police to arrive after Breivik began his murderous rampage, armed with a Glock pistol and a Ruger Mini-14, which was reportedly modified from semi-automatic to fully automatic fire.

Breivik surrendered to police as soon as they arrived on the island, fuelling speculation that his spree could have ended sooner had the police arrived more quickly. The force helicopter was unavailable at the time, and the crew was on holiday.

Risk 

Police sources have indicated that Breivik’s trial is likely to take place before next year.  Although he is still in custody for another seven weeks, prosecutors have already begun preparing their indictment.

Terrorism laws are likely to be used against him but Norway has faced stiff international criticism for the leniency of these. The maximum penalty under anti-terror legislation would be 21 years, which many feel is not adequate for the slaying of over 70 children.

Breivik may be charged with crimes against humanity instead, which could lead to his being awarded an indeterminate sentence renewable every five years.



Published on Thursday, 28th July, 2011 at 18:29 under the news category, by Gareth Corfield.
Last updated on 28th July 2011 at 21:34.

This post has the following tags: andersbehringbreivik, utoeyashootings, oslobombing, geirlippestad, jensstoltenberg.





  
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