Norwegian pre-school education questioned / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian pre-school education questioned. Calls for day-cares to have a more academic focus arise following researchers’ find that children in Norway are still trailing compared to other countries. “Norwegian kindergartens are good at play and care, but our research shows that the day-care must do more to facilitate learning in other areas of development to a greater extent,” said University of Stavanger Reading Centre employee Elin Reikerås to research site forskning.no. “The day-cares seriously should take the fact into consideration that there are some children soon to be five who cannot write their name or count to ten ,” she added.

norwayeducation, norwayday-care, pre-schools, norwayuniversities



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Norwegian pre-school education questioned

Published on Monday, 29th July, 2013 at 10:18 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 29th July 2013 at 19:40.

Calls for day-cares to have a more academic focus arise following researchers’ find that children in Norway are still trailing compared to other countries.

Rows of pencils
Rows of pencils
Photo: Iv Nikolny/Shutterstock Images


“Norwegian kindergartens are good at play and care, but our research shows that the day-care must do more to facilitate learning in other areas of development to a greater extent,” said University of Stavanger Reading Centre employee Elin Reikerås to research site forskning.no.

“The day-cares seriously should take the fact into consideration that there are some children soon to be five who cannot write their name or count to ten ,” she added.

Moreover, whilst it has been found that increasing administrative tasks take key teacher-child time away, many day-cares are understaffed because of a shortage of qualified teachers, with children not getting the challenges they need.

Researcher Ms Reikerås thinks what the study has found means Norway’s pre-schools have to pull their socks up.

“Our results show that there are children who are not able to do things they should be able to. This means that Norwegian day-cares must have a stronger academic focus,” she stated.

Nevertheless, Socialist Left (SV) Minister of Education Kristin Halvorsen has said that it a deliberate policy choice not to define nurseries as education.

National guidelines also stress the importance of developing communication, language, and social skills.

She praises Norway’s tradition of children learning through play, arguing this method stands them in good stead in later schooling.

“It [learning] is about becoming familiar with letters, numbers, spaces, and shapes,” she commented to regional publication Aftenbladet in an email.

“We want teachers with teacher training to work systematically with learning to write and count in schools.”




Published on Monday, 29th July, 2013 at 10:18 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 29th July 2013 at 19:40.

This post has the following tags: norwayeducation, norwayday-care, pre-schools, norwayuniversities.





  
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