Norwegian Queen commemorates witchcraft victims / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norwegian Queen commemorates witchcraft victims. Queen Sonja of Norway has opened a memorial in dedication to men and women convicted of witchcraft during the 17th Century. Her Majesty visited the Arctic village of Vardø, Finnmark, on Thursday to commemorate the 135 people accused of being witches and sorcerers between 1598 and 1692, including children under the age of twelve. 91 people, 77 women and 14 men, were executed by burning. Aftenposten reports 13 men  were of Sami ancestry. The executions in Finnmark accounted for 31 percent of those convicted.

queensonjavardoe, witchburningsnorway, memorialfinnmark



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Norwegian Queen commemorates witchcraft victims

Published on Sunday, 26th June, 2011 at 23:18 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last Updated on 26th June 2011 at 23:32.

Queen Sonja of Norway has opened a memorial in dedication to men and women convicted of witchcraft during the 17th Century.



Her Majesty visited the Arctic village of Vardø, Finnmark, on Thursday to commemorate the 135 people accused of being witches and sorcerers between 1598 and 1692, including children under the age of twelve.

91 people, 77 women and 14 men, were executed by burning. Aftenposten reports 13 men  were of Sami ancestry. The executions in Finnmark accounted for 31 percent of those convicted.

“I have heard thatthis story has generatedinterest far beyond the Norwegian borders,” said HRH Queen Sonja, telling NRK afterwards “It was like going to trial.”

The memorial statue, designed by American artist Louise Bourgeois and Swiss architect Peter Zumthor, consists of information on many of the victims and is placed where they were commonly burned to death.

“The witch-hunts burnings must have made a strong impact on the local communities creating a lot of insecurityand fear as to who would be accused of being a witch next,” SolbjørgEllingsen Fossheim, state archivist at the National Archives in Tromsø, told Aftenposten.

The opening to the memorial coincided with Midsummer’s Eve, celebrated in Norway with gatherings around bonfires.

To see a picure of the memorial, click here (external link in Norwegian).



Published on Sunday, 26th June, 2011 at 23:18 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last updated on 26th June 2011 at 23:32.

This post has the following tags: queensonjavardoe, witchburningsnorway, memorialfinnmark.





  
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