Norwegian researchers predict dramatic climate change / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian researchers predict dramatic climate change. Worse than UN panel assumes. The atmosphere’s CO2 absorption rate has decreased. According to dagsavisen.no, two Norwegian researchers have forecast that climate change could happen faster than previously predicted. Reduced rate of absorption Two professors from the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research attached to the University of Bergen have found evidence suggesting that amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere could be up to 25 percent higher than calculated.

climate, change, co2, greenhouse, gases, harmful, emissions, un, ipcc, absorption, glaciers, melting



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Norwegian researchers predict dramatic climate change

Published on Tuesday, 25th August, 2009 at 14:19 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 25th August 2009 at 22:41.

Worse than UN panel assumes.

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Photo: Martin Muransky/Shutterstock Images


The atmosphere’s CO2 absorption rate has decreased. According to dagsavisen.no, two Norwegian researchers have forecast that climate change could happen faster than previously predicted.

Reduced rate of absorption

Two professors from the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research attached to the University of Bergen have found evidence suggesting that amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere could be up to 25 percent higher than calculated.

“Nature has begun to impose limits. This reduces the quantity of CO2 that is being absorbed,” Professor Helge Drange tells the paper.

Higher temperatures

For now, roughly half of CO2 emissions go in to the atmosphere, contributing to an increased greenhouse effect, whilst the rest is absorbed by land vegetation and the sea. But the sea is now not absorbing as much as before because water temperatures have risen.

“Over time vegetation on land will also take up less. As nature’s absorption of CO2 decreases, concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere will be raised by 20-25 percent. This will mean a global temperature increase of up to one degree,” says Professor Eystein Jansen.

Drange believes that they will increase by up to four degrees Celsius; something which will have serious repercussions. He predicts irreparable damage to the environment, and huge repercussions on both food production and the availability of water.

A vicious circle

And as temperatures rise, so will the level of the sea as a result of increased glacial melting.

“The level of the sea could rise by one metre globally, even though we are far from sure at the moment,” Drange says.

Should the consequences pointed out in their revised climate model be avoided, he believes that harmful emissions need to be cut by more than 50 percent by 2050.

“This also means that one should be aiming to cut emissions by 85 percent…This is very radical.”

Both Drange and Jansen have been involved in the UN climate panel’s work (IPCC), and the new climate model’s simulations will form the basis of the IPCC’s next report due in 2013.



Published on Tuesday, 25th August, 2009 at 14:19 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 25th August 2009 at 22:41.

This post has the following tags: climate, change, co2, greenhouse, gases, harmful, emissions, un, ipcc, absorption, glaciers, melting.





  
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