Norwegian women’s political knowledge trails men’s / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian women’s political knowledge trails men’s. Women across the world know less about politics than men, according to a study by the University of London. “It’s not only that women tend to know less about public affairs, but they are more disconnected to the political process,” said Professor James Currain, director of the university’s Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre, which led the 10-country study. “Women are more inclined to say they are not interested in politics than men. Women are also more inclined to say politics are complicated and difficult to understand,” he continued.

norwaypolitics, genderequalitynorway



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Norwegian women’s political knowledge trails men’s

Published on Sunday, 28th July, 2013 at 09:02 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

Women across the world know less about politics than men, according to a study by the University of London.

Norwegian ballot box
Norwegian ballot box
Photo: Lars Røed Hansen/Wikimedia Commons


“It’s not only that women tend to know less about public affairs, but they are more disconnected to the political process,” said Professor James Currain, director of the university’s Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre, which led the 10-country study.

“Women are more inclined to say they are not interested in politics than men. Women are also more inclined to say politics are complicated and difficult to understand,” he continued.

In Norway, a country with world-leading gender equality, gaps between men’s and women’s political interests were also larger than expected.

“We actually discovered exactly the opposite of what we initially thought,” the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s (NTNU) Professor Toril Aalberg told NRK.

“It wasn’t that gender gaps were smallest in Norway and in the countries that score highest on the gender equality indicators, but on the contrary, there were considerable gaps between men's and women's political interests.”

73 per cent of men correctly-answered the questions posed, whilst it was just over half for women.

The professor also remarked results indicate that Norwegian women score highly regarding political knowledge in comparison to women from other countries, “but Norwegian men [score] the highest. Thus, the gap is largest in Norway, despite the fact that Norwegian women know more than American and Canadian men [do],” he stated.

However Aftenposten’s political editor, Harald Stanghelle, thinks that the results are partly due to men’s confidence.

“I think the inherited, artificial confidence that we men have means that we probably are better at pretending that we know, even if we’re not sure.”

1,000 people participated in the University of London-led internet-based survey. It was carried out in Australia, Canada, Colombia, Greece, Italy, Japan, Norway, South Korea, the UK, and the US.



Published on Sunday, 28th July, 2013 at 09:02 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: norwaypolitics, genderequalitynorway.





  
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