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The Foreigner Norwegians’ attitudes to LGBTs only slightly better. Uni Research has presented the largest ever report on the situation of gays, lesbians, bisexuals and trans-genders (LGBT) in Norway. Commissioned by the Norwegian Directorate of Children, Youth and Family Affairs (Bufetat), the report focuses on the living conditions of and the attitudes towards LGBT groups. “People’s general attitudes to people with different sexual orientations have improved, there is no doubt about that,” said Bufetat director Mari Trommald to NRK.

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Norwegians’ attitudes to LGBTs only slightly better

Published on Sunday, 10th November, 2013 at 08:28 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.
Last Updated on 10th November 2013 at 08:53.

Uni Research has presented the largest ever report on the situation of gays, lesbians, bisexuals and trans-genders (LGBT) in Norway.



Commissioned by the Norwegian Directorate of Children, Youth and Family Affairs (Bufetat), the report focuses on the living conditions of and the attitudes towards LGBT groups.

“People’s general attitudes to people with different sexual orientations have improved, there is no doubt about that,” said Bufetat director Mari Trommald to NRK.

“Still, there are too many people who possess discriminating attitudes towards people with a different sexual orientation,” she added.

There are fewer heterosexual men in 2013 that hold negative attitudes towards lesbians and gay men – decreasing respectively from 17 to 8 percent and 27 to 16 percent – but the number of negative attitudes is still considered high.

16 percent of the 611 men surveyed about their attitudes towards LGBT people stated that have distanced themselves from gay men in the last 12 months.

Around 40 percent of these men also said that that they thought sex between two men is wrong, and 22 percent thought the same about sex between two women. 

“We should have zero tolerance for such attitudes. It’s not acceptable to discriminate, not even on the basis of sexual orientation,” declared Bufetat’s Ms. Trommald.

The report also showed that many homosexuals, lesbians and bisexuals had stated that they had attempted to take their own lives.  

The situation was worse among bisexual women.

Among 1,134 self-defined lesbians, gay or bisexual participants:

  • 10 percent of gay men and 11 percent of bisexual men stated that they had attempted suicide.
  • 12 percent of lesbians and 19 percent of bisexual women stated to having attempted suicide.
  • 65 percent of bisexual women and 51 percent of bisexual men reported that they had sometimes thought about not wanting to live anymore. Among heterosexual women and men (1,768 surveyed), these figures lay around 30 and 40 percent.

Bård Nylund, leader of the Norwegian LGBT Association (LLH) thinks it is good that there is more awareness on bisexual people’s living conditions.

“I know that the period of my life where it was worst for me was when I called myself bisexual,” he said.

“It was the most confusing period, at the time doubting who I was and where I was going, it was chaotic,” added Mr. Nylund.

He continued by saying that several of those who call themselves bisexual struggle to gain acceptance from both the heterosexual and homosexual and lesbian environments.  

“There are surely many that feel that they have gotten a response like ‘yes, you says that you’re bisexual? You can come back in a few years, and then we’ll see’,” he said.

“It’s definitely no useful contribution to the process these people go through,” he added.  

He hopes that more bisexual people will come out about their sexuality.

“There’s little talk about being bisexual, and I think it’s a pity that there are so few bisexual voices in society,” said Mr. Nylund.




Published on Sunday, 10th November, 2013 at 08:28 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.
Last updated on 10th November 2013 at 08:53.

This post has the following tags: gayrightsnorway, norwaylesbianrights, transsexualrightsnorway, norwaydiscrimination.





  
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