Norwegians claim immigration policy failing / News / The Foreigner

Norwegians claim immigration policy failing. One in two Norwegians thinks the country has enough immigrants and criticise the government for its policies. 53.7% of the 1,380 people surveyed said they want to see a stop in the numbers of immigrants being accepted into Norway, according to latest results from Integrerings Barometeret (translated “Integration Barometer”). The figure was 45.8% when the inquiry was first conducted in 2005. Two Norwegians Aftenposten met in Bislett, scene of last month’s drive-by shooting that killed Einar Opsahl, believe the media is mainly responsible for the increased xenophobia shown by the poll.

norwegianimmigrationpolicy, languagetuitionforforeigners, norwegianxenophobia



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Norwegians claim immigration policy failing

Published on Thursday, 7th July, 2011 at 16:12 under the news category, by John Price and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 7th July 2011 at 19:54.

One in two Norwegians thinks the country has enough immigrants and criticise the government for its policies.

Norwegian border
Norwegian border
Photo: Hardo Müller/Flickr


At the same time Norway needs more people to fill vacant positions, especially engineers, an increase in the number of immigrants entering Norway has made the natives sceptical, reports Aftenposten.

53.7% of the 1,380 people surveyed said they want to see a stop in the numbers of immigrants being accepted into Norway, according to latest results from Integrerings Barometeret (translated “Integration Barometer”). The figure was 45.8% when the inquiry was first conducted in 2005.

Two Norwegians Aftenposten met in Bislett, scene of last month’s drive-by shooting that killed Einar Opsahl, believe the media is mainly responsible for the increased xenophobia shown by the poll.

“It is unfortunate that so many are negative towards further immigration, but I'm not surprised. I think the [Norwegian] media is to blame to a large degree. Newspapers and television should tell the truth if an immigrant shoots a man on the street, as happened here in Bislett, but by doing so, it influences many to generalise about foreigners” says 25-year old Laura Emdal.

Declaring foreigners, Norwegians, and politicians should do more to aid integration, 24-year-old Elise Larsen Håvoll says, “Everyone should have to take a language test, not just a course.”

Foreigners now have to complete 600 hours of Norwegian tuition instead of 300 previously. However, both Laura Emdal and her Canadian partner Chris Parsons, who came to Norway as an immigrant four years ago, claim the courses need modernising.

“The problem with these is that many participate because they have to and don’t pay attention,” he says, having chosen to take a test instead.

Whilst the fur is flying over who is to responsible, results of the poll show 60% and 83.5% blame Norwegians and foreigners, respectively, for their lack of integration efforts. Six out of ten criticise authorities for their unsuccessful clampdown on high levels of immigration.

On a positive note, 88 percent of Norwegians think immigrants should have the same rights to jobs as their so-called ‘ethnic Norwegian’ peers, according to the inquiry, which shows they respect foreigners’ traditions and values.

Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre has also announced that foreigners can apply for visas, residence permits, or citizenship online.

“Using the application portal, you can register your visa application wherever you are, whenever you like, without any queue. This reduces waiting time for applicants and ensures more effective processing of all types of applications,” he said.

Norwegian authorities dealt with between 100-450 applications a day last year, and received 18,000 requests to reside in the country.




Published on Thursday, 7th July, 2011 at 16:12 under the news category, by John Price and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 7th July 2011 at 19:54.

This post has the following tags: norwegianimmigrationpolicy, languagetuitionforforeigners, norwegianxenophobia.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!