Norwegians’ happiness-wage level connection decreasing in importance, just slightly / News / The Foreigner

Norwegians’ happiness-wage level connection decreasing in importance, just slightly. Higher wages can make a person happier but only up to a certain amount, psychologists argue. Norwegian experts say their countrymen are increasingly going for idealism instead. Daniel Kahneman and Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of Economics and International Affairs, Angus Deaton, have been examining the impact that money has on everyday happiness. Israeli-American Mr Kahneman, who won 2002’s Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, believes the maximum magic happy sum to be 720,000 US dollars – or some 720,000 when applied to Norwegian conditions.

norwayhappiness, moneynorway, worknorway



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Norwegians’ happiness-wage level connection decreasing in importance, just slightly

Published on Monday, 9th December, 2013 at 15:06 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

Higher wages can make a person happier but only up to a certain amount, psychologists argue. Norwegian experts say their countrymen are increasingly going for idealism instead.

Thousand-kroner notes
Thousand-kroner notes
Photo: Norges Bank


Daniel Kahneman and Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of Economics and International Affairs, Angus Deaton, have been examining the impact that money has on everyday happiness.

Israeli-American Mr Kahneman, who won 2002’s Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, believes the maximum magic happy sum to be 720,000 US dollars – or some 720,000 when applied to Norwegian conditions.

They asked participants several questions about their previous 24 hours emotions including whether they had experienced joy, were angry, or worried. Experts’ next question was whether they felt these emotions would change with a higher income.

The results suggested an income higher than 75,000 dollars would not lead to real change in their emotions.

Norway professor Ottar Hellevik, at the University of Oslo’s Faculty of Social Sciences, believes research company Ipsos MMI’s biannual survey ‘Norsk Monitor’ echoes the American experts’ results.

Having studied Norwegians’ economic habits, values, and happiness levels via the survey since 1985, the professor concludes Norwegians (in the homogenous land of oil and money) also feel happier the more they earn.

Each extra 100,000 kroner earned raises this by 5 per cent, Aftenposten reports Professor Hellevik as explaining.

“Comparing yourself with others is customary. One becomes dissatisfied easier if you feel you’re a poorer relative in relation to others in the neighbourhood, city or country you live in,” he said.

At the same time, the academic explains he thinks the money=happiness pendulum is beginning to swing back more towards idealism than in the 90s.

“This [idealism] also affects the level of happiness. An idealist is happier with lower earnings than a materialist is. We can actually see a small rise in Norwegians’ happiness levels since 2003 [via the Ipsos biannual poll], concludes professor Hellevik.




Published on Monday, 9th December, 2013 at 15:06 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: norwayhappiness, moneynorway, worknorway.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!