Nuclear submarine fire mystery deepens / News / The Foreigner

Nuclear submarine fire mystery deepens. The ‘Yekaterinburg’ torpedo compartment blaze could have had catastrophic consequences even though it did not affect the reactor. Environmental organisation Bellona reported the damaged Delta-IV class sub sailed from the Roslyakovo dry dock to Severodvinsk in Arkhangelsk Oblast via the Okol’naya base. Equipment at Okol’naya includes cranes to remove ballistic missiles. The Russian Defence Ministry refused to confirm the Okol’naya route, maintaining there was no weaponry about ‘Yekaterinburg’.

russiasubmarinefire, yekaterinbergblaze



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Nuclear submarine fire mystery deepens

Published on Sunday, 8th January, 2012 at 20:55 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and John Price      .

The ‘Yekaterinburg’ torpedo compartment blaze could have had catastrophic consequences even though it did not affect the reactor.

Hole cut in Yekaterinburg torpedo compartment
Hole cut in Yekaterinburg torpedo compartment
Photo: Anonymous commenter


Environmental organisation Bellona reported the damaged Delta-IV class sub sailed from the Roslyakovo dry dock to Severodvinsk in Arkhangelsk Oblast via the Okol’naya base. Equipment at Okol’naya includes cranes to remove ballistic missiles.

The Russian Defence Ministry refused to confirm the Okol’naya route, maintaining there was no weaponry about ‘Yekaterinburg’.

Nevertheless, Bellona’s Alexander Nikitin, a former Russian submarine captain, claimed leaving any such arsenals aboard, including Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs) or nuclear warheads, is common for short-term repairs.

The 18,200-ton vessel can carry up to 16 ICBMs, each with four warheads, as well as 12 torpedoes. According to RT, these missiles were removed beforehand.

Meanwhile, Vice-Admiral Einar Skorgen, former commander of defence for northern Norway, said there was never any danger the fire would damage the reactor, which had been shut down.

“As far as I know, there are two important things that are located forward in the submarine, the torpedo tubes pass through the section and the sensors are [also] located there,” he told NRK.

To damage the reactor, the fire “would have to have occurred on the inside f the pressure-proof hull, but there is little chance that it might have happened.”

He alleged the Russians withheld information about the fire “to hide they had made another mistake.” The 'Yekaterinburg' blaze took 20 hours to extinguish. It is estimated nine people were injured.

To see more pictures, click here.



Published on Sunday, 8th January, 2012 at 20:55 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and John Price      .

This post has the following tags: russiasubmarinefire, yekaterinbergblaze.





  
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