OECD recommends Norway alter mental healthcare measures / News / The Foreigner

OECD recommends Norway alter mental healthcare measures. OECD countries are recognising mental health problems as being an increasing problem for the social and labour market. Norway has the highest figures for sick leave and benefit payments, a new OECD report shows. Norway has had the highest spending on disability benefits for 15 year. Almost 5% of the GDP is spent on benefits almost double the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) average, according to the report. The OECD has therefore provided a list of recommendations to tackle Norway’s growing problem. These include providing incentives for people to stay in work, help NAV (Labour and Welfare Administration) intervene more quickly, and making sure GP’s are more confident assessing patients.

norwayhealthcare, mentalhealthnorway, workingnorway



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OECD recommends Norway alter mental healthcare measures

Published on Monday, 4th March, 2013 at 14:52 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 8th March 2013 at 09:40.

OECD countries are recognising mental health problems as being an increasing problem for the social and labour market. Norway has the highest figures for sick leave and benefit payments, a new OECD report shows.

Young woman overwhelmed by work (illus. ph.)
Young woman overwhelmed by work (illus. ph.)
Photo: Shutterstock/Danie Nel


Norway has had the highest spending on disability benefits for 15 year. Almost 5% of the GDP is spent on benefits almost double the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) average, according to the report.

The OECD has therefore provided a list of recommendations to tackle Norway’s growing problem. These include providing incentives for people to stay in work, help NAV (Labour and Welfare Administration) intervene more quickly, and making sure GP’s are more confident assessing patients.

This report suggests that Norway needs to introduce strict criteria for permanent disability benefits, as well as strengthening to treatments and rehabilitation available to those who claim.

It also highlighted that people with mental health problems had a much higher rate of unemployment across the OECD compared to the national average.

The report also criticises the medical process. It states that it comes in too late, and that getting employees back into work is not down to GP’s but down to the employee and their employer.

Moreover, there are recommendations that the disability assessment process is changed, as the current system relies on the claimants themselves and does not involve the input of a mental health specialist.

The importance of education to the labour market and that mental health problems in pupils should be assessed better, the OECD states.

According to the report, this could be a contributing factor in the amount of pupils not completing upper secondary education in Norway.

Overall, the OECD report gives nine main areas of recommendation for Norway to tackle the mental health problems of employees, and to get as many people as possible off disability benefits and back into work

OECD employment experts John Martin and Niklas Baer presented the report to Norway's Minister of Labour, Anniken Huitfeldt, Monday.




Published on Monday, 4th March, 2013 at 14:52 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 8th March 2013 at 09:40.

This post has the following tags: norwayhealthcare, mentalhealthnorway, workingnorway.





  
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