Officials ‘split up’ marriage / News / The Foreigner

Officials ‘split up’ marriage. Norway tax authorities have forced a couple married for 41 years to separate, reports say. The couple were obliged to take out the legal separation following spouse Aage Myrvold’s decision to move to be nearer his daughter and her children, whilst Mrs Myrvold had to stay in home in Asker to receive necessary specialist treatment at the local hospital. Nonetheless, Norwegian tax law stipulates spouses must be registered at and live in the same property. The only exception to this is if they do not share a common home and visit one another less than once every three months.

norwaytaxauthorities, norwegianresidentialobligationrules



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Officials ‘split up’ marriage

Published on Monday, 13th February, 2012 at 14:32 under the news category, by John Price   .

Norway tax authorities have forced a couple married for 41 years to separate, reports say.

Leather travel case
Leather travel case
Photo: zibber/Shutterstock Images


The couple were obliged to take out the legal separation following spouse Aage Myrvold’s decision to move to be nearer his daughter and her children, whilst Mrs Myrvold had to stay in home in Asker to receive necessary specialist treatment at the local hospital.

Nonetheless, Norwegian tax law stipulates spouses must be registered at and live in the same property. The only exception to this is if they do not share a common home and visit one another less than once every three months.

The couple have stated they wished to remain classified as married, but several appeals to officials allowing them to live apart despite this were unsuccessful.

Calling it “a hopeless situation,” Mr Myrvold told NRK, “I asked if it was to do with obligation of residence but it wasn’t. I then asked enquired if we had to live together for taxation reasons, it wasn’t [that either]. I don’t really know what the basis is, they haven’t really given me any explanation.”

The couple has been given support from Progress Party member Christian Tybring-Gjedde who proposed to the government would have a rethink about the Act, “We have asked the government look at the legislation, so it may be easier for married couples who do not want to stay together. We do not want that someone forced to live together,” he said.

Meanwhile, Progress Party (FrP) Christian Tybring-Gjedde MP has asked the government to reconsider relaxing the rules despite Minister of Finance Sigbjørn Johnsen’s statement there are already some exemptions, thus aking this unnecessary.

“These exceptions the ministry refers to have been shown not to work in practise, and many peoples’ applications are declined in cases where it is perfectly natural they live apart.”



Published on Monday, 13th February, 2012 at 14:32 under the news category, by John Price   .

This post has the following tags: norwaytaxauthorities, norwegianresidentialobligationrules.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!