Oil industry inspires Norway salmon farming methods / News / The Foreigner

Oil industry inspires Norway salmon farming methods. Norwegian salmon has always been in high demand, traditionally. A company has now come up with a solution for farming more of the freshwater fish in biologically suitable and exposed areas. Salmar is Norway’s third-largest producer of salmon. The company is now starting to put their “offshore aquaculture” project into action, which they have been planning for two years. The 5,600-ton steel semisubmersible structure with a control room and accommodation quarters will have a 245,000 cubic metre capacity (about 8.65 million cubic feet) when built.

norwaysalmon, oil, salmonfarming



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Oil industry inspires Norway salmon farming methods

Published on Friday, 7th March, 2014 at 06:47 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.

Norwegian salmon has always been in high demand, traditionally. A company has now come up with a solution for farming more of the freshwater fish in biologically suitable and exposed areas.

The semi-submersible fish farm facility
This oil industry-inspired structure could mean salmon farming in this way in two years.The semi-submersible fish farm facility
Photo: Ocean Farming (part of Salmar)


Salmar is Norway’s third-largest producer of salmon. The company is now starting to put their “offshore aquaculture” project into action, which they have been planning for two years.

The 5,600-ton steel semisubmersible structure with a control room and accommodation quarters will have a 245,000 cubic metre capacity (about 8.65 million cubic feet) when built.

It will be designed for operation in depths of between 100 and 300 metres (roughly 328-984 feet).

Based on oil platform technology, the facility’s measurements are 67 metres high by 110 metres in diameter (some 220 by 316 feet), Salmar say.

“The facility is designed to withstand nine metre high waves,” project leader and former Statoil top executive Gunnar Myrebøe told Dagens Næringsliv, “existing ones can withstand three to four metres” (about 29 and 10-13 feet, respectively).

He added that the construction’s slack-anchoring means it floats very stably. The semi-submersible structure means “neither the weather nor waves will be particularly noticeable.” Eight anchors will secure the facility.

According to Salmar, they will be putting the pilot project facility’s EPC contract out for tender during the spring of this year.

Start-up and introducing the stocks of fish will take place in 2016 at the earliest.

Facts:                                        

  • 2-4 people will man the facility during the day to supervise and control the operations.
  • This can also be achieved by remote control.
  • The type of tank used is intended to limit the number of fish escaping and reduce sea lice and exposure to infection, Dagens Næringsliv reports.


Published on Friday, 7th March, 2014 at 06:47 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.

This post has the following tags: norwaysalmon, oil, salmonfarming.





  
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