Oil sector goes futuristic / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Oil sector goes futuristic. Two humanoid robots are to help University of Stavanger engineering students learn about robotics in the oil industry. ‘Roberta’ and ‘Robert’, delivered by French company Aldebaran Robotics, cost around 100,000 kroner each and can recognise voices and faces when programmed to do so. They are designed to handle tasks classified as too hazardous to humans. According to University of Stavanger Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering Professor Sven Ole Aaase, “The curriculum renewal is directly based on changes in the oil and gas industry.”

humanoidrobotsrobertaandrobert, universityofstavangerroboticsstudies



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Oil sector goes futuristic

Published on Tuesday, 14th February, 2012 at 14:38 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Two humanoid robots are to help University of Stavanger engineering students learn about robotics in the oil industry.



‘Roberta’ and ‘Robert’, delivered by French company Aldebaran Robotics, cost around 100,000 kroner each and can recognise voices and faces when programmed to do so. They are designed to handle tasks classified as too hazardous to humans.

According to University of Stavanger Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering Professor Sven Ole Aaase, “The curriculum renewal is directly based on changes in the oil and gas industry.”

“They are concentrating more and more on automation and the use of robots in the drilling process, which creates a great need for engineers with such expertise.”

Broadcaster NRK reports ABB has also supplied two industrial robots for the study programme.

“In some cases, development in extreme and remote environments requires engineers to use expensive equipment resembling space suits to shield them from toxic gases. In the future, humanoid robots can carry out the work that is dangerous for humans,” said ABB’s director for development, Christoffer Apneseth.

Shell has given the university 4.3 million kroner to help increase relevant robotic competence skills, as well as develop automation technology studies further.


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Published on Tuesday, 14th February, 2012 at 14:38 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: humanoidrobotsrobertaandrobert, universityofstavangerroboticsstudies.





  
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