Oslo academics question foreign study schemes / News / The Foreigner

Oslo academics question foreign study schemes. Study abroad programmes are under scrutiny following concerns over Norwegian higher education institutions’ practises. The University of Oslo (UiO) wrote to education officials in 2011, asking whether charging high fees and student activity offers were not contravening government policy. One company’s prices start from NOK 64,000 (about USD 11,300 at today’s ROE) for a five-month stay.

norwayuniversities, norwaystudyabroad, norwaytuitionfees



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Oslo academics question foreign study schemes

Published on Monday, 22nd October, 2012 at 09:54 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 22nd October 2012 at 16:26.

Study abroad programmes are under scrutiny following concerns over Norwegian higher education institutions’ practises.

Kuta Beach, Bali
A popular tourist spot on BaliKuta Beach, Bali
Photo: Ibenkjoker/Wikimedia Commons


The University of Oslo (UiO) wrote to education officials in 2011, asking whether charging high fees and student activity offers were not contravening government policy.

One company’s prices start from NOK 64,000 (about USD 11,300 at today’s ROE) for a five-month stay.

These programmes are part-financed by the Norwegian government’s loan board, but students are not liable for tuition fees according to university legislation.

Personnel objected to the way studying abroad with pastimes such as swimming in exotic places was offered as a method of attracting students.

The Ministry of Education’s answer on its decision no law was being violated failed to satisfy them.

Rector Ole Petter Ottersen is now advocating clearer regulations. He argues government legislation stipulates a foreign study destination-study programme relationship.

“For a study period abroad to be considered as ‘internationalisation’, the education must take advantage of local institutions, culture or language so that there is a real synergy between place and education,” he tells publication University World News.

Numbers of Norwegians choosing to study abroad rose by 7 percent in 2011. 14,200 students choose to study for their Bachelor’s degree in another country. The figure was 9,100 students at Master’s level.

Rector Ottersen has said his university is declining requests from companies wishing cooperation on advertising to students wishing foreign study.

“I only want to criticise those programmes that do not fit in, and where surfing and bathing might be a primary mover”, he said, qualifying his view, “We have to optimise the use of our resources, and then it is international collaboration with a high quality that counts.”



Published on Monday, 22nd October, 2012 at 09:54 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 22nd October 2012 at 16:26.

This post has the following tags: norwayuniversities, norwaystudyabroad, norwaytuitionfees.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!