Oslo citizens welcome high immigrant numbers / News / The Foreigner

Oslo citizens welcome high immigrant numbers. The average Norwegian is unafraid that nearly half of Oslo's population will have immigrant backgrounds by 2040, a survey conducted for newspaper Aften shows. According to the poll, 38 percent of the respondents believe life will remain the same, 23 percent think the city could benefit from more immigrants, and 32 percent think it would be disadvantageous. Conservative (H) city council leader Stian Berger Røsland believes this shows the capital’s inhabitants are neither insular, nor set in their ways.

immigrationoslo, norwegianimmigrationpolicy



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Oslo citizens welcome high immigrant numbers

Published on Wednesday, 28th March, 2012 at 14:56 under the news category, by The Foreigner.
Last Updated on 28th March 2012 at 15:35.

The average Norwegian is unafraid that nearly half of Oslo's population will have immigrant backgrounds by 2040, a survey conducted for newspaper Aften shows.

Oslo skyline
Oslo skyline
Photo: Inez Dawczyk/The Foreigner


According to the poll, 38 percent of the respondents believe life will remain the same, 23 percent think the city could benefit from more immigrants, and 32 percent think it would be disadvantageous.

Conservative (H) city council leader Stian Berger Røsland believes this shows the capital’s inhabitants are neither insular, nor set in their ways.

"This reflects that most of us living in Oslo are people who themselves have moved to the city or are the result of migration. At the same time, we have respect for those who find this difficult," he tells Aftenposten. 

Mr Røsland believes the most important thing to prevent people being skeptical to the future and feel secure instead is by providing access to education, jobs and housing.

"We will do what we can to ensure that concerns many feel, will not lead anywhere. We will do this by ensuring that important values such as equality, human rights and freedom of speech are preserved," he declares.

Statistics Norway (SSB) recently released forecasts showing that the current share of immigrants and Norwegian-born citizens with an immigrant background will increase to up to 50 percent of the city’s population. 

Researcher Svein Blom says he would have thought the results from Aften’s poll would have been different bearing in mind his organisation’s findings, but that the latest figures echo earlier SSB surveys.

"People in Oslo are generally more favorable towards immigrants than people elsewhere in the country. We are accustomed to having them here, we mix with them daily, and many of us know immigrants personally. That is why we don’t find it so frightening there will be more," he added.

Not everyone views SSB’s forecasts about an increasing number of immigrants as being positive though, including 39 percent of those who live in Groruddalen.

“The white middle class often moves out of an area when the minority proportion increases. Experience from other European countries shows that those who stay often feel abandoned and find that they have full responsibility for integration,” states Ketil Raknes, Socialist Left Party (SV) policy advisor.

Progress Party (FrP) leader for Oslo, Christian Tybring-Gjedde, claims, “Those who live in areas with many immigrants find it negative, while those who are most positive almost never interact with non-Western immigrants. Why don’t they move to Groruddalen to promote integration if they are so approving?”

FrP Party leader Siv Jensen has called for a stricter policy to prevent an increasing number of immigrants in Norway.



Published on Wednesday, 28th March, 2012 at 14:56 under the news category, by The Foreigner.
Last updated on 28th March 2012 at 15:35.

This post has the following tags: immigrationoslo, norwegianimmigrationpolicy.


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