Oslo drug sales concern politicians / News / The Foreigner

Oslo drug sales concern politicians. A hidden camera has raised attention to how many drugs are being sold in public places in Norway’s capital. Police have arrested over 200 people in connection with selling illegal drugs so far this year. With the help of a hidden camera, Sunday, NRK reported Western African men staying illegally in Norway after being refused asylum accounted for the vast majority of sales on the streets of Grünerløkka. The money they get is used for survival. Norway’s ideas on how to tackle drug crimes have differed. In latest attempts, Labour’s (Ap) Minister of Justice Knut Storberget said that smaller drug crimes should not be punishable. He suggested those responsible should choose their punishment, either dialogue with a counsellor or prison.

oslodrugsproblem, criminalasylumseekers



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Oslo drug sales concern politicians

Published on Tuesday, 19th July, 2011 at 12:45 under the news category, by Alison Kennedy.
Last Updated on 20th July 2011 at 14:11.

A hidden camera has raised attention to how many drugs are being sold in public places in Norway’s capital.

A syringe
A syringe
Photo: permanently scatterbrained/Flickr


Police have arrested over 200 people in connection with selling illegal drugs so far this year. With the help of a hidden camera, Sunday, NRK reported Western African men staying illegally in Norway after being refused asylum accounted for the vast majority of sales on the streets of Grünerløkka. The money they get is used for survival.

Norway’s ideas on how to tackle drug crimes have differed. In latest attempts, Labour’s (Ap) Minister of Justice Knut Storberget said that smaller drug crimes should not be punishable. He suggested those responsible should choose their punishment, either dialogue with a counsellor or prison.

“I want to emphasize that the proposals do not involve any legalisation or decriminalisation, of drugs offenses. It is, rather, a question of punishingin a way that works, by tailoringa reaction that does something about the cause of the offence.”

Other Parties are divided on how to tackle the issue of drugs. Politicians from the Centre (Sp) and Conservative (H) Parties are in favour of more police on the streets, while Progress (FrP), Liberal (V), and Christian Democratic (KrF) representatives want to tackle the asylum system.

Liberal leader Trine Skei Grande says, “One has to stop undermining the asylum system now. Applications should be processed extremely quickly and throw them out. Don’t send them to other Schengen countries, as they will be back here as soon as they have arranged a flight ticket.”

Both Progress’ Mazyar Keshvari and Haakon Brænden of the Christian Democrats call for separating asylum seekers until they are deported.

“We want to strengthen efforts to send rejected asylum seekers out of the country. You have to isolate asylum seekerswho sell drugs, when this occurs repeatedly,” says Mr Brænden.



Published on Tuesday, 19th July, 2011 at 12:45 under the news category, by Alison Kennedy.
Last updated on 20th July 2011 at 14:11.

This post has the following tags: oslodrugsproblem, criminalasylumseekers.





  
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