Oslo IMSI Catcher affair shocking, politicians say / News / The Foreigner

Oslo IMSI Catcher affair shocking, politicians say. Norwegian parliamentarians censure security officials for dawdling over the alleged false mobile base stations in the capital. Progress’ (FrP) Justice Minister Anders Anundsen has delivered his account to parliament, with security and telecommunications companies actively seeking possible culprits behind the possible surveillance. “Nobody found it their responsibility to act” Opposition politicians are fairly low-key regarding the Minister’s explanation, but demand action is taken.

spying, imsi, mobiles, politics, espionage, surveillance, paywall



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Oslo IMSI Catcher affair shocking, politicians say

Published on Thursday, 8th January, 2015 at 00:40 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 12th January 2015 at 20:24.

Norwegian parliamentarians censure security officials for dawdling over the alleged false mobile base stations in the capital.

The Norwegian Parliament, Oslo
One can briefly summarise what happened regarding the false base stations in Oslo as being a pulverisation of responsibility,” remarks a top opposition MPThe Norwegian Parliament, Oslo
Photo: ©2014 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


Progress’ (FrP) Justice Minister Anders Anundsen has delivered his account to parliament, with security and telecommunications companies actively seeking possible culprits behind the possible surveillance.

“Nobody found it their responsibility to act”

Opposition politicians are fairly low-key regarding the Minister’s explanation, but demand action is taken.

“I think [Minister] Anundsen addressed the central issues in his speech, with its content and tone appropriate for the situation. The problem is that he couldn’t go into many things for reasons of security and because of the current investigation,” Bård Vegar Solhjell MP, deputy Socialist Left Party (SV) leader told The Foreigner.

Mr Solhjell was reasonably satisfied as to how the Minister went through the division of responsibility and cooperation between the various public agencies.

Bård Vegar Solhjell, deputy SV leader
Bård Vegar Solhjell, deputy SV leader
Åsmund Holien Moe/Flickr
“But at the same time, it raises a huge question mark as to why it took the Police Security Service (PST) and other government agencies three days to start an investigation. This was information they knew beforehand. I hope it doesn’t make solving the matter difficult,” said the MP.

But there is still no indication as to who the possible perpetrators are, then?

“I didn’t expect him to disclose information as to who might be behind the surveillance, and he probably didn’t want to start a discussion about it himself.”

How do you feel Minister Anundsen addressed the matter’s central issues?

“He went through the National Security Authority’s (NSM) and PST’s work, which gave me a reasonably solid impression, but nobody found it their responsibility to act.”

“I believe we need a broader debate about communications, to examine private-public cooperation, and to discuss the balance between personal freedom and the government’s need for control. Very few people realise how easy it is to listen in. Politicians know how to protect themselves against this, but not mid-Ministry officials or companies,” Bård Vegar Solhjell declared.

A pulverisation of responsibility

Jenny Klinge MP, the Centre Party’s representative on the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Justice thanked Justice Minister Anundsen for orienting parliament.

Jenny Klinge MP
Jenny Klinge MP
Bernt Sønvisen/Flickr
At the same time, she called the revelations of possible illegal surveillance of Norwegian nationals, persons, and the milieu that represents society’s vital interests “shocking”.

“It was shocking for several reasons. We were not only dealing with false base stations in the vicinity of parliament, government offices, the Prime Minister’s residence, and a couple of other places, but also with reactions by Norwegian security authorities.”

Anders Anundsen led the hearing by Parliament’s Standing Committee on Scrutiny and Constitutional Affairs into the government’s follow-up of the 22nd July Commission’s report when Progress was in opposition in 2012.

Some of the issues covered were the reasons, and who was responsible for the complete emergency preparedness failures in significant areas on 22nd July 2011.

Why the warnings were not taken seriously, and the reason for the apparent pulverisation of responsibility in the contingency and security areas was also covered.

“One can briefly summarise it [what happened regarding the false base stations in Oslo] as a pulverisation of responsibility,” said Jenny Klinge MP.

Lengthy task

She also censures security and communications authorities for how they handled the matter.

Police Security Service building (PST)
Police Security Service building (PST)
Hans-Petter Fjeld/Wikimedia Commons
“The PST, NSM, and Norwegian Communications Authority (NKOM) conveyed how important preventative work is, but nobody put up their hand and said that they themselves might have a considerable responsibility to detect this particular type of surveillance,” Ms Klinge remarked.

Moreover, she commented that the PST initially said that these types of base stations were not something that they should hunt for, and that “the most important thing is that we politicians learn not to discuss sensitive matters on an open line.”

“They nonetheless chose to accept the offer of obtaining the raw data from Aftenposten later on and have opened an investigation. The top political responsibility for this lies with the Minister of Justice,” concluded Ms Klinge MP.

PST senior advisor Martin Bernsen said that the Service has started compiling information and speaking to people, “but this investigation will take some time.”

“This is partly due to that we have a lot of data to go through, and have to check it and the information very carefully.”




Published on Thursday, 8th January, 2015 at 00:40 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 12th January 2015 at 20:24.

This post has the following tags: spying, imsi, mobiles, politics, espionage, surveillance, paywall.





  
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