Oslo Roma forcibly removed / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Oslo Roma forcibly removed. Police in Oslo today began forcibly removing an encampment by the side of the Sognsvann lake at which between 60 and 100 Roma people have been living. Last week a Norwegian court granted permission to the owner, Statsbygg, to remove between 20-30 tents from the site. The law permits camping on the site, but for a maximum of 48 hours. The Roma, who are citizens of Romania, have the legal right to live in Norway. Both countries are members of the European Economic Area. Many of the tent-dwellers are from the Romanian county of Buzãu.

romapeoplenorway, romaevictions



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Oslo Roma forcibly removed

Published on Monday, 19th November, 2012 at 22:42 under the news category, by Ben McPherson.

Police in Oslo today began forcibly removing an encampment by the side of the Sognsvann lake at which between 60 and 100 Roma people have been living.



Last week a Norwegian court granted permission to the owner, Statsbygg, to remove between 20-30 tents from the site. The law permits camping on the site, but for a maximum of 48 hours.

The Roma, who are citizens of Romania, have the legal right to live in Norway. Both countries are members of the European Economic Area. Many of the tent-dwellers are from the Romanian county of Buzãu.

Unemployment amongst the Roma has been very high since the fall of Communism in Romania. As traditional farming methods were abandoned and industrial processes changed, many lost jobs in traditionally secure industries. Farms were mechanised and bought up by speculators, and the Roma were thrown off the land.

The forced removal of the Roma is controversial. Norwegian Rightist politicians support enforced repatriation.

“People who come to Norway and believe that they must be looked after by Norway must be asked to return home, and if they don’t do it willingly, they must be forced,” the Conservative's (H) governing Mayor of Oslo, Stian Berger Røsland, told NRK earlier this year. Link

But Bjønnulv Evenrud of the humanitarian organisation Folk er folk today told the Foreigner, “They come here due to economic need, and they suffer discrimination throughout Europe. Being here and earning money is their best option. It’s very sad that the Norwegian authorities meet them with a policy of zero tolerance.”

According to Mr Evenrud, a number of Roma left the encampment yesterday, but did not know where they would move on to. Temperatures in Oslo, which are currently just below freezing at night, can drop to -25 degrees Celsius in the middle of winter.




Published on Monday, 19th November, 2012 at 22:42 under the news category, by Ben McPherson.

This post has the following tags: romapeoplenorway, romaevictions.





  
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