Oslo Science Conference 2010 News: Scientists Warn of Rising Sea Levels / News / The Foreigner

Oslo Science Conference 2010 News: Scientists Warn of Rising Sea Levels. COP15 talks-stimulating report reveals melting glaciers the main cause of the phenomenon. A report published by the Norwegian Polar Institute called Melting Snow and Ice: A Call for Action, has highlighted a possible increase in sea levels of up to 1.5 meters of sea levels by the end of the century. "Melting glaciers and the melting ice sheets in the Arctic and Antarctic will account for 75% of the rise in sea levels, while expansion of the water as it warms will account for 25 %," said Director Jan-Gunnar Winther of the Norwegian Polar Institute.

oslo, science, conference, polar, research, icebergs, amundsen, sea, west, antarctic, ice, sheet, norwegian, polar, institute



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Oslo Science Conference 2010 News: Scientists Warn of Rising Sea Levels

Published on Thursday, 10th June, 2010 at 10:14 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

COP15 talks-stimulating report reveals melting glaciers the main cause of the phenomenon.

Antarctic iceberg, Amundsen Sea, West Antartica 21.10.09
Antarctic iceberg, Amundsen Sea, West Antartica 21.10.09
Photo: NASA/Jane Peterson/Wikimedia Commons


A report published by the Norwegian Polar Institute called Melting Snow and Ice: A Call for Action, has highlighted a possible increase in sea levels of up to 1.5 meters of sea levels by the end of the century.

"Melting glaciers and the melting ice sheets in the Arctic and Antarctic will account for 75% of the rise in sea levels, while expansion of the water as it warms will account for 25 %," said Director Jan-Gunnar Winther of the Norwegian Polar Institute.

According to Professor Tim Naish of the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, approximately 150 million people living on the coastline and about one metre inland will be directly affected by these climate changes.

Naish’s findings come as a result from his current research project on ice cores from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, an area representative for assessing the impact of melting glaciers.

Cornell University’s postdoctoral researcher Mike Willis has determined the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, as well as glaciers in the Amundsen Sea area, show a higher melting rate than previously estimated.

"As glaciers grow and shrink, the earth moves up and down. By monitoring the earth's movement with GPS technology, we can take the earth out of the equation and come up with more accurate measures of the ice masses," he said.

Yesterday’s first IPY-OSCPolar EXCHANGE hosted by award-winning BBC journalist Sue Nelson also included another first, when scientist Tom Jordan and his team showed never-before seen images of the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains.

Two more Polar EXCHANGE sessions will take place today and tomorrow in the Plenary Hall.



Published on Thursday, 10th June, 2010 at 10:14 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

This post has the following tags: oslo, science, conference, polar, research, icebergs, amundsen, sea, west, antarctic, ice, sheet, norwegian, polar, institute.





  
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