Oslo wine theft leaves bitter aftertaste / News / The Foreigner

Oslo wine theft leaves bitter aftertaste. Gardermoen Airport personnel outwit the pilferer with a penchant for the precious. Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 is an expensive, legendary, and highly sought-after bottle of wine. The Bordeaux has sold for an average price of GBP 8,921 ex tax, according to website wine-searcher.com.

oslo, wine, thief, airport, taxfree



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Oslo wine theft leaves bitter aftertaste

Published on Monday, 30th November, 2015 at 13:19 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Sarah Bostock   .
Last Updated on 30th November 2015 at 14:01.

Gardermoen Airport personnel outwit the pilferer with a penchant for the precious.

Oslo Gardermoen International Departures
Oslo Gardermoen International Departures
Photo: Knut Bry/Oslo Lufthavn AS


Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 is an expensive, legendary, and highly sought-after bottle of wine.

The Bordeaux has sold for an average price of GBP 8,921 ex tax, according to website wine-searcher.com.

“But there are some merchants selling it for considerably more than that,” Anthony Rose, wine correspondent for The Independent, tells The Foreigner.

“Prices vary considerably, which is not surprising given the fact that the condition of the wine and its packaging also vary and that the provenance is not always traceable,” he adds.

Oslo Airport’s tax free shop has two genuine examples for sale, reduced from some GBP 20,265 to GBP 12,615 (NOK 265,000 decreased to NOK 165,000 at today’s ROE).

But the wine is so expensive, that two mock-ups were placed on the shelves instead. One customer dropped the first, and the other has now gone missing. 

“We quickly discovered that it had been stolen during one of the morning rushes at the store,” Martin Arentz, assortment manager at Travel Retail Norway says to business daily Dagens Næringsliv.

There is now just a poster of the wine hanging in the place where both mock-ups used to be.

V for Victory

Commenting on Château Mouton Rothschild, Anthony Rose explains that until 1924, the wine left in barrels.

Baron Philippe de Rothschild decided to bottle the wine at the château in 1924 and to draw attention to this revolutionary practice, and commissioned the poster designer Jean Carlu, to come up with a suitable label.

“At the end of WW2, the Baron conceived the idea of decorating the Mouton Rothschild label with a work of art to commemorate the Allied victory” Mr Rose tells The Foreigner.

A symbolic design was chosen to celebrate the arrival of peace and the return to normality. The Baron commissioned the design from Philippe Jullian, a young relatively unknown artist, who later became a successful playwright and essayist.

From various sketches submitted by Jullian, the Baron chose the V for Victory, the same victory sign used by Churchill and the code sign of the French Resistance, transmitted from London in Morse code throughout the Occupation.

“The Baron’s one-off idea was to become a tradition and each year thereafter an artist was chosen to illustrate the label with an original work in exchange for cases of Château Mouton Rothschild. Artists have included Jean Hugo, Jean Cocteau, Georges Braque, Dali, Miró, Chagall, Henry Moore, and Andy Warhol,” says Anthony Rose.

A tiny crop was harvested in L’Année de le Victoire but it was the most acclaimed vintage of the century thanks to the celebration of the end of the most destructive period in history and the fact that a tiny crop yielded high quality, concentrated wines.

Buyer beware

“In the best wines, it took almost 50 years to reach its peak and the greatest wines of the vintage, Château Mouton Rothschild included, are still going strong, with the proviso that they have been stored in pristine condition throughout their life,” he adds.

In Wine Spectator August 1997, the American critic Robert Parker wrote that it is "...truly one of the immortal wines of the century.”

“This wine is easily identifiable because of its remarkably exotic, over-ripe, sweet nose of black fruits, coffee, tobacco, mocha, and Asian spices. It is an extraordinarily dense, opulent, and rich wine, with layers of creamy fruit, behaving more like a 1947 Pomerol than a structured, powerful, and tannic 1945. The wine finishes with a 60+ second display of ripe fruit, extract, and sweet tannin. This remarkably youthful wine (only light amber at the edge) is mindboggling...” (100pts RP)

It is unknown whether the person who whisked it off the shelves was aware that the bottle was only a copy.

And in general, those considering purchasing any bottle should conduct research before doing so.

“Recent frauds and the case of Rudy Kurniawan in particular have raised issues of provenance over very old bottles of the finest wines of Bordeaux and Burgundy. Anyone considering splashing out over £10k a bottle for such an icon wine should therefore do their homework and make sure that both the condition of the wine and its provenance are impeccable,” Anthony Rose warns.

The best vintages for Chateau Mouton Rothschild are 1928, 1929, 1945, 1948, 1949, 1953, 1959, 1961, 1982, 1986, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, and 2014.

(Additional source: The Wine Cellar Insider).



Published on Monday, 30th November, 2015 at 13:19 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Sarah Bostock   .
Last updated on 30th November 2015 at 14:01.

This post has the following tags: oslo, wine, thief, airport, taxfree.





  
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