Parliamentarians adopt wrong constitution / News / The Foreigner

Parliamentarians adopt wrong constitution. One four-year term can be a long time in politics. A recent parliamentary gaffe regarding Norway’s revised constitution has given Norwegian MPs long faces. Norway has two forms of Norwegian: bokmål and nynorsk. The first is based on Danish due to a 434-year union with Denmark (1380-1814). This preceded the 1814-1905 union with Sweden. Nynorsk is based on dialects collected by Ivar Aasen. While never the twain shall meet, it seemed the East-West – or even North-South – divide caused bureaucrats and MPs additional headaches when the new version of Norway’s constitution was passed on 17th May in this bicentennial year, however.

1814, constitution, parliament, politics, mps



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Parliamentarians adopt wrong constitution

Published on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014 at 06:44 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

One four-year term can be a long time in politics. A recent parliamentary gaffe regarding Norway’s revised constitution has given Norwegian MPs long faces.

The Norwegian Parliament, Oslo
The error was discovered a few weeks after the fact, officials say.The Norwegian Parliament, Oslo
Photo: ©2014 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


Norway has two forms of Norwegian: bokmål and nynorsk. The first is based on Danish due to a 434-year union with Denmark (1380-1814). This preceded the 1814-1905 union with Sweden. Nynorsk is based on dialects collected by Ivar Aasen.

While never the twain shall meet, it seemed the East-West – or even North-South – divide caused bureaucrats and MPs additional headaches when the new version of Norway’s constitution was passed on 17th May in this bicentennial year, however.

The adoption’s bokmål form was approved without any ensuing issues, but the nynorsk version contained up to 25 linguistic differences, Aftenposten has reported.

What was passed was, in fact, a draft.

The Foreigner asked parliament (Stortinget) for comment.

How did the issue occur?

“In 2011 the Storting’s Presidium commissioned the Graver Committee to formulate a version of the Norwegian Constitution in bokmål and nynorsk. Several draft constitutional amendments were put forward that were based on the committee’s report.”

When was the error spotted?

“A proposed nynorsk version of the Norwegian Constitution, which was assumed by the proposers to be identical to the Graver Committee’s nynorsk draft bill, has since been shown to depart from the Graver Committee’s version on certain points. This was discovered a few weeks after the adoption.”

“In retrospect it appears that the Graver Committee’s draft bill was made subject to an extra round of linguistic adjustments. These adjustments were not incorporated into the draft constitutional amendment in question,” officials say.

How does this make the nynorsk version invalid and therefore not legally binding, if applicable?

“The differences that have arisen have no legal implications. Nor have any errors of a constitutional nature occurred. The version that was put forward in the draft constitutional amendment was also the one that was later adopted.”

“Consequently, the differences between the Graver Committee’s nynorsk version and the nynorsk constitutional text that was adopted in the Storting are of a linguistic nature only and do not change the substantive content of the Constitution.”

When and how can the matter be resolved?

“In the event that there is a wish to amend the adopted nynorsk version of the Constitution, any desired amendments must be put forward in the form of a new draft constitutional amendment. These must be made by one or more Members of the Storting, and such a draft bill may only be adopted in the next parliamentary term,” elucidate officials.

Norway’s next general election is scheduled to take place in 2017.




Published on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014 at 06:44 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: 1814, constitution, parliament, politics, mps.





  
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