Praying to Allah academic institution-dependent / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Praying to Allah academic institution-dependent. As humankind’s diverse religious beliefs continue, Oslo’s educational establishments have different practices regarding permitting Muslims to pray, reports show. Debate about whether to allow separate prayer spaces in Oslo’s Upper Secondary schools came to the fore last week following city education official Torgeir Ødegaard’s change-of-heart prompted by the Progress Party (FrP). The Conservative (H) councillor had previously decided to let school principals make the decision, but subsequently declared that establishing these spaces were “out of the question”.

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Praying to Allah academic institution-dependent

Published on Wednesday, 3rd October, 2012 at 14:15 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan   .

As humankind’s diverse religious beliefs continue, Oslo’s educational establishments have different practices regarding permitting Muslims to pray, reports show.



Debate about whether to allow separate prayer spaces in Oslo’s Upper Secondary schools came to the fore last week following city education official Torgeir Ødegaard’s change-of-heart prompted by the Progress Party (FrP).

The Conservative (H) councillor had previously decided to let school principals make the decision, but subsequently declared that establishing these spaces were “out of the question”.

His move drew criticism from Socialist Left (SV) Minister for Education Kristin Halvorsen.

Meanwhile, Vidar L. Haanes, Principal of the MF Norwegian School of Theology – a university level Christian priest education institution – says he has nothing against Muslims praying to Allah in the building.

“We’ve had several Muslim students in recent years. They’ve asked to be given a prayer room, which we have turned down” he explains to Christian newspaper Vårt Land today. “We don’t wish to furnish a room [specially] for these students, but do facilitate that they can have their prayer gatherings at resting room in the basement.”

“Nonetheless, these gatherings do not take place under MF’s auspices,” he concludes.

Bishop of Oslo Ole Christian Kvarme has rallied against city councillor Torgeir Ødegaard, calling his decision “hasty without considering the reach.”

Many of Norway’s public institutions, such as hospitals, prisons, universities and colleges have chapels and quiet rooms where people can go and pray in silence.



Published on Wednesday, 3rd October, 2012 at 14:15 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan   .

This post has the following tags: oslointegration, muslimsoslo, osloschoolprayer.


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