Pregnant women advised to take precautions against Influenza A / News / The Foreigner

Pregnant women advised to take precautions against Influenza A. Norwegian authorities cautious, whilst British midwives advise them to stay at home. The spread of Influenza A (H1N1) has been limited in Norway so far, with most people having been infected abroad. However, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Folkehelseinstituttet) has now advised pregnant women to seriously consider whether they need to travel to countries with a high number of cases. Britain is one of them.Complications According to the Institute, there is no proof as yet that the H1N1 virus is more dangerous for pregnant women than anyone else, but they are more at risk of developing complications such as pneumonia or breathing difficulties should they become infected. Serious complications can lead to either a miscarriage, or the baby being born prematurely.

pregnant, women, influenza, swine, h1n1, precautions, treatment, home, tamiflu, testing, norwegian, authorities, institute, public, health, midwives



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Pregnant women advised to take precautions against Influenza A

Published on Monday, 3rd August, 2009 at 21:50 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Norwegian authorities cautious, whilst British midwives advise them to stay at home.

Pregnant woman holding medicine
Pregnant woman holding medicine
Photo: Newphotoservice/Shutterstock Images


The spread of Influenza A (H1N1) has been limited in Norway so far, with most people having been infected abroad. However, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Folkehelseinstituttet) has now advised pregnant women to seriously consider whether they need to travel to countries with a high number of cases. Britain is one of them.

Complications

According to the Institute, there is no proof as yet that the H1N1 virus is more dangerous for pregnant women than anyone else, but they are more at risk of developing complications such as pneumonia or breathing difficulties should they become infected. Serious complications can lead to either a miscarriage, or the baby being born prematurely.

Last week, however, British midwives advised pregnant women to stay at home, after a heavily-pregnant 39 year-old woman died from the H1N1 virus.

“We are trying to find ways to collate as much data as possible in order to assess the impact of H1N1 on pregnant women and their babies. We don't know yet whether this virus behaves differently in pregnant women but they seem to have a higher risk of becoming more seriously ill,” Dr Boon Lim from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists told The Independent.

Precautions

Although the Institute has not yet gone as far as the British midwives, they do recommend that pregnant women take preventative measures. If they do intend to travel to high-risk areas, they advise them to talk to their doctor about the necessity of taking a pack of Tamiflu with them. They should certainly avoid all contact with those who have been infected.

“Pregnant women shouldn’t risk being exposed to infection and practise good hand hygiene. If they work in the health sector, they should be shielded from treating infected patients, and should avoid areas where there is an increased risk of infection, such as camps and concerts,” the Institute’s chief physician, Hans Blystad tells Dagbladet.

Treatment

Pregnant women are also advised to contact their doctor should a member of their household become ill – when preventative treatment with Tamiflu may be given – or if they develop symptoms themselves. The signs to look for are fever, combined with coughing, a sore throat, a runny nose, pain in the muscles or joints, a headache, and either vomiting or diarrhoea.

In such cases, the Institute recommends immediate treatment with Tamiflu, and that the patient is tested for the illness.



Published on Monday, 3rd August, 2009 at 21:50 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: pregnant, women, influenza, swine, h1n1, precautions, treatment, home, tamiflu, testing, norwegian, authorities, institute, public, health, midwives.





  
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