Problems delayed forces trip to Utøya massacre / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Problems delayed forces trip to Utøya massacre. Some of the 86 people may have been alive today if police had access to the right equipment at the time, it has been revealed. The police had a very small boat which held less people than were on the vehicle, and the boat appeared to be sinking due to the overcrowding on some occasions, reports Reuters. “When so many people and equipment were put into it, the boat started to take on water, so that the motor stopped,” said Erik Berga, police operations chief in northern Buskerud district.

oslobombing, utoeyashootings, andersbehringbreivik



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Problems delayed forces trip to Utøya massacre

Published on Monday, 25th July, 2011 at 14:15 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last Updated on 26th July 2011 at 22:55.

Some of the 86 people may have been alive today if police had access to the right equipment at the time, it has been revealed.



The police had a very small boat which held less people than were on the vehicle, and the boat appeared to be sinking due to the overcrowding on some occasions, reports Reuters.

“When so many people and equipment were put into it, the boat started to take on water, so that the motor stopped,” said Erik Berga, police operations chief in northern Buskerud district.

Police response was also delayed by the decision to bring a special armed unit to the island, some 45 kilometres away from the capital.

Sissel Hammer, Chief of Hønefoss police chief says she hopes people understand why it took so long for the police to arrive.

“The personnel have to be notified, they must put on protective gear, arm themselves and get out to the area,” she said in a statement.

Only one helicopter was available during the time of the shootings, but this had been grounded for four weeks during the summer holiday as regular procedure. The Oslo-based unit was 50-60km away from the capital at Rygge Airport.

Sveinung Sponheim, acting police chief in Oslo said, “It was faster going by car, because we would have had to get a helicopter from the base down south.”

Anders Breivik’s monstrous killings went undisturbed for a whole hour. The police were called in to the scene at 17:27 Norwegian time, arriving at the scene at 18:25. Breivik surrendered two minutes later.

The mass murderer’s court hearing began place today at 13:00 under media blackout as a measure to prevent further publicity for his views. He is expected to receive a maximum of 21 years in prison if convicted.

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Published on Monday, 25th July, 2011 at 14:15 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last updated on 26th July 2011 at 22:55.

This post has the following tags: oslobombing, utoeyashootings, andersbehringbreivik.





  
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