Progress Party to end child benefit / News / The Foreigner

Progress Party to end child benefit. Norway’s Progress Party (FrP) plans to remove current child welfare payments for foreigners and replace them with tax breaks. Currently families with children under 18 who reside in Norway receive benefits each month. Opposition politicians have made the proposals to try to stop foreign nationals sending the benefit they receive abroad. There are two main types of benefit: one is a statutory monthly payment applying to all children under 18, the other is so-called ‘child cash’, which compensates parents choosing to stay at home with their 1 to 3-year-olds instead of working and sending them to full-time day care.

norwaychildcashwelfare, polishworkersnorway



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Progress Party to end child benefit

Published on Monday, 27th August, 2012 at 15:13 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

Norway’s Progress Party (FrP) plans to remove current child welfare payments for foreigners and replace them with tax breaks.

Per Sandberg
Per Sandberg argues the new system will allow for increased regulation of payments if adoptedPer Sandberg
Photo: Progress Party


Currently families with children under 18 who reside in Norway receive benefits each month. Opposition politicians have made the proposals to try to stop foreign nationals sending the benefit they receive abroad.

There are two main types of benefit: one is a statutory monthly payment applying to all children under 18, the other is so-called ‘child cash’, which compensates parents choosing to stay at home with their 1 to 3-year-olds instead of working and sending them to full-time day care.

In June, the Conservative Party (H) called for welfare payment restrictions regarding child cash, with spokesperson Linda Hofstad Helleland telling The Foreigner at the time, “other family members can come and look after the children should they satisfy the immigration requirements” instead.

Progress’ Per Sandberg believes ‘converting’ child benefit payments into tax breaks will mean much improved regulation.

Krzysztof Orleanski from Trondheim’s Polish Association finds this prejudiced. He believes that Polish workers in Norway who pay taxes should be entitled to the benefit. About 67,300 Poles live in Norway currently.

“It is unfair. Norway needs the Polish labour. We are working legally and paying taxes, but do not get the same rights as everyone else”.

Torgeir Micaelsen, Chairman parliament’s Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs, is not yet against the Progress Party’s proposal, even though “he tends to do this when they suggest something.

“I don’t think one should necessarily reject such a proposal before having reviewed it properly,” he said to NRK.




Published on Monday, 27th August, 2012 at 15:13 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: norwaychildcashwelfare, polishworkersnorway.





  
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