Provincialism alive and well in Stavanger / News / The Foreigner

Provincialism alive and well in Stavanger. Norway’s oil capital is not as international as it claims to be. Business leaders prefer to cooperate on a regional level, according to a new report. The leadership survey conducted by the International Research Institute of Stavanger (IRIS) shows the region’s businesses are not more innovative, and leaders are less interested in people with new ideas than their counterparts in other Norwegian cities. “I am surprised. The way it was presented tears a hole in our own image of being an innovative and international region,” Mayor Leif Johan Sevland tells Stavanger Aftenblad.

stavanger, iris, leif, johan, sevland, mayor, provincial, international, foreigner, foreign, sparebank1, report



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Provincialism alive and well in Stavanger

Published on Tuesday, 14th September, 2010 at 13:51 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Norway’s oil capital is not as international as it claims to be. Business leaders prefer to cooperate on a regional level, according to a new report.

Stavanger
Stavanger
Photo: Jacob Bøtter/Flickr


“Surprised”

The leadership survey conducted by the International Research Institute of Stavanger (IRIS) shows the region’s businesses are not more innovative, and leaders are less interested in people with new ideas than their counterparts in other Norwegian cities.

“I am surprised. The way it was presented tears a hole in our own image of being an innovative and international region,” Mayor Leif Johan Sevland tells Stavanger Aftenblad.

Stavanger lags behind businesses in Oslo and Bergen when it comes to working with other foreign countries. 45 percent of those who answered the poll would rather work with local and regional people than outsiders.

“Openness is very important for international cooperation, but perhaps the Stavanger Region’s business leaders have been too concerned with regional teamwork to manage to be receptive to the surrounding world?” asks researcher Rune Dahle Fitjar.

Early days

Mayor Sevland has previously told The Foreigner Stavanger faces tough competition from other European capitals when it comes to attracting and keeping a qualified international workforce.

North Sea oil and gas is expected to run out in the future. An earlier IRIS report financed by Sparebank1, called “Scenarier 2020”, shows the Stavanger Region aims to be Norway’s most competitive and best area when it comes to stimulating innovation.

Sevland has also said he believes culture will play an important part, but is unwilling to comment further until he has investigated the report thoroughly.

“It is too early to draw proper conclusions. We have to sit down and go through the report with IRIS to find out why it deviates from traditional perceptions.

Different

Elin Schanche, head of Greater Stavanger admits she sees a lack of openness amongst business leaders. Greater Stavanger works with business development and internationalisation.

“Our culture is not particularly open. How often have you been invited to dinner at someone’s house as a foreigner here?”



Published on Tuesday, 14th September, 2010 at 13:51 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: stavanger, iris, leif, johan, sevland, mayor, provincial, international, foreigner, foreign, sparebank1, report.





  
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