PST chief: ‘Not even Stasi’ could have stopped Breivik / News / The Foreigner

PST chief: ‘Not even Stasi’ could have stopped Breivik. Janne Kristiansen, head of the Norway's Police Security Service (PST), suggests only chips in people’s brains could have prevented Anders Behring Breivik committing the Utøya atrocity. The Norwegian security chief’s remarks come as scrutiny moves away from Breivik’s murderous rampage to the authorities’ response to his killing spree. “We cannot find his name in any databases. He has lived a very law-abiding life - a double life where he has been extremely outgoing, but made violent statements to others. Almost the entire population of Norway would have had to been registered on ours in order for him to be so. (...) The only way [to discover him] would have been a chip inside people's heads”, said Kristiansen to Dagbladet.

andersbehringbreivik, utoeyashootings, oslobombing, stasi, jannekristiansen, policesecurityservice, pst



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PST chief: ‘Not even Stasi’ could have stopped Breivik

Published on Monday, 8th August, 2011 at 10:08 under the news category, by Gareth Corfield.

Janne Kristiansen, head of the Norway's Police Security Service (PST), suggests only chips in people’s brains could have prevented Anders Behring Breivik committing the Utøya atrocity.

Janne Kristiansen, Head of PST
Janne Kristiansen, Head of PST
Photo: PST/Flickr


The Norwegian security chief’s remarks come as scrutiny moves away from Breivik’s murderous rampage to the authorities’ response to his killing spree.

“We cannot find his name in any databases. He has lived a very law-abiding life - a double life where he has been extremely outgoing, but made violent statements to others. Almost the entire population of Norway would have had to been registered on ours in order for him to be so. (...) The only way [to discover him] would have been a chip inside people's heads”, said Kristiansen to Dagbladet.

Stasi, or Ministerium für Staatsicherheit (Ministry of State Security), was East Germany’s feared intelligence service. East German citizens stormed the service’s headquarters when the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, discovering millions of files that recorded details of virtually every East German individual’s life, from movements to associates, hobbies, and pastimes.

Breivik bought 3000kg of ammonium-based fertiliser from abroad, but was not considered a threat by the Norwegian security services. Although he was active in the online ‘counter-jihad’ environment, making numerous posts on anti-Muslim websites, he gave no hints that he was about to go on the rampage.



Published on Monday, 8th August, 2011 at 10:08 under the news category, by Gareth Corfield.

This post has the following tags: andersbehringbreivik, utoeyashootings, oslobombing, stasi, jannekristiansen, policesecurityservice, pst.





  
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