Racism concept gets hands off in Norway / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Racism concept gets hands off in Norway. UDPATED: Norwegians are too politically correct to use the term racism and prefer to shy away instead, an academic believes. Professor Jon Rogstad at research organisation Fafo believes that people prefer to use the term discrimination instead as it seems more innocent. “[The term] racism probably challenges understanding of what our core values are a lot more ​​than discrimination does. The latter can be explained by some uncertainty and fear of the unknown,” he told NRK.

norwayracism, immigrationnorway



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Racism concept gets hands off in Norway

Published on Monday, 11th March, 2013 at 07:38 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 11th March 2013 at 13:20.

UDPATED: Norwegians are too politically correct to use the term racism and prefer to shy away instead, an academic believes.



Professor Jon Rogstad at research organisation Fafo believes that people prefer to use the term discrimination instead as it seems more innocent.

“[The term] racism probably challenges understanding of what our core values are a lot more ​​than discrimination does. The latter can be explained by some uncertainty and fear of the unknown,” he told NRK.

The academic has previously highlighted the problem of discrimination in Norway regarding job applications.

Research conducted by him showed how people with foreign-sounding names were less likely to be called for an interview despite identical qualifications.

“We may have a burden to bear in terms of that we think that we are so good because we are so concerned with equality, but we may not be as good as we like to think of ourselves as being when it comes down to it,” he said.

Talking of Norwegian public officials, Professor Rogstad tells The Foreigner, Monday, "the racism debate is problematic here. The authorities really look upon themselves and the Norwegian population as being innocent, very proud of being equal and inclusive."

"Former [Labour] Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland's saying was 'it's typically Norwegian to be good', but she never said 'to be best'," the professor concludes.




Published on Monday, 11th March, 2013 at 07:38 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 11th March 2013 at 13:20.

This post has the following tags: norwayracism, immigrationnorway.





  
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