Racy electric cars come to Oslo / News / The Foreigner

Racy electric cars come to Oslo. The newest electric cars on the market were displayed outside Oslo's Folketeateret, adding an extra zip to the ZERO Emission Conference.

norwayclimate, co2, climatechange



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Racy electric cars come to Oslo

Published on Wednesday, 6th November, 2013 at 15:59 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Linn Schjerven   .
Last Updated on 6th November 2013 at 19:36.

The newest electric cars on the market were displayed outside Oslo's Folketeateret, adding an extra zip to the ZERO Emission Conference.

Mercedes Benz SLS AMG Coupé Electric Drive
Mercedes Benz SLS AMG Coupé Electric Drive
Photo: © 2013 Linn Schjerven/The Foreigner


The selection included the BMW i3, the Volvo C30 Electric Generation, the Peugeot Partner Electric to the latest class-act by Mercedes, the Mercedes Benz SLS AMG Coupé Electric Drive.             

“This car’s got 751hp and will take you from 0 to 60mph in under 4 seconds,” Mercedes technician Steinar Nygaard told The Foreigner, Wednesday.

A look under the Mercedes' hood
A look under the Mercedes' hood
© 2013 Linn Schjerven/The Foreigner
And for EUR 350,000 (some NOK 2.82 million), the racing beauty’s electronically-limited engine will give driver and passengers a top speed of 250kph (about 155mph) on Norway’s slow, or any other road.

“This car is actually EUR 100,000 more if you buy it in Germany”, Mr Nygaard explained, “but current Norwegian government incentives means you don’t pay an øre in tax.”

This particular model, the third produced so far this year, had been sold to an undisclosed buyer in Norway.

“It’s the world’s first supercar. Mercedes say it’s in series production, and you can have one if you want and can afford to pay for it.”

The vehicle’s range is about 250km before it needs charging, which will take between three and five hours on a standard 22 KW charge.

Charge up and go with Volvo's C30
Charge up and go with Volvo's C30
© 2013 Linn Schjerven/The Foreigner
“But that’s an absolute maximum. The electrically-heated seats, indicators, lights, dashboard aren’t what drains the power, it’s the AC compressor,” Mr Nygaard, who has been a technician at Mercedes for 17 years, explained.

According to him, only AMG can service the engine when needed, though.

“I can perform first-line diagnostics and repairs, but technicians will have to be sent out for anything more. That’s not a problem,” he adds.

ABB's fast charging station
ABB's fast charging station
© 2013 Linn Schjerven/The Foreigner
No electric car is of any use without power, of course. Also on show at the exhibition was Swedish-Swiss company ABB’s fast-charge station. Representatives were present to give viewers a peak at their new Terra 53 CJG multi-standard DC charging station.

“This can achieve an 80-per cent charge in between 15 and 30 minutes, depending on the vehicle’s battery,” said sales representative Arne Sigbjørnsen.

“Nevertheless, that’s due to current lithium ion battery technology. It just can’t charge any faster when it’s reached this, as most of the slow charging is done in the last 20 per cent.”

ABB currently has some 55 per cent of the market share of fast chargers in Norway. These are different to for example the council-owned ones found on streets and in parking facilities, for example.

So do different cars take longer?

Nissan Leaf electric car
Nissan Leaf electric car
© 2013 Linn Schjerven/The Foreigner
“That’s right. The Nissan Leaf, with a 20 to 24 KW battery will take about 30 minutes, whilst Mitsubishi’s i-MiEV will do it in 15,” stated Mr Sigbjørnsen. “And all car owners have to do to use this one is choose their connector type and plug in.”

Moreover, it will take between six to eight hours to charge a car using standard ones.

“You can’t put one of these in your home garage, though,” he smiled.

Project Grønn Bil aims to have 200,000 electric and rechargeable hybrid cars on the roads in Norway by 2020.

In September the Tesla Model S became the first electric car to top sales statistics in this country.




Published on Wednesday, 6th November, 2013 at 15:59 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Linn Schjerven   .
Last updated on 6th November 2013 at 19:36.

This post has the following tags: norwayclimate, co2, climatechange.





  
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