Rainy seasons damage grain quality / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Rainy seasons damage grain quality. Heavy rains have badly affected Norway’s grain harvests following the wettest summer and autumn since the 1970’s. 30-40 percent of the grain harvest is still in the fields and its quality is not as good as it should be, according to corn dealers. “There are many places in Eastern Norway where only around ten percent of the grain is of a quality good enough for human consumption. The rest of it will be used as animal fodder. It’s normally about 80 percent in a normal year,” Felleksjøpet agricultural supply chain’s Kristian Thunes said to Aftenposten.

wetnorwegiansummer, cornproblems, potatofarmers



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Rainy seasons damage grain quality

Published on Friday, 23rd September, 2011 at 13:23 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 23rd September 2011 at 16:26.

Heavy rains have badly affected Norway’s grain harvests following the wettest summer and autumn since the 1970’s.



30-40 percent of the grain harvest is still in the fields and its quality is not as good as it should be, according to corn dealers.

“There are many places in Eastern Norway where only around ten percent of the grain is of a quality good enough for human consumption. The rest of it will be used as animal fodder. It’s normally about 80 percent in a normal year,” Felleksjøpet agricultural supply chain’s Kristian Thunes said to Aftenposten.

Anders Nordstad in Lantmännen Cerealia, suppliers to the baking industry, reports this has been a bumper year for harvests in the former Soviet Union are good, whilst EU totals are normal.

According to him, Norway will need to import approximately 250,000 tons of grain this year, and says, “it’s a crisis for many farmers, but not the mills or consumers. The extremely wet summeris a local phenomenon, which has caused problems for Norwegian grain farmers and some problems in other countries in Northern Europe.”

Norwegian Minister of Agriculture, Lars Peder Brekk, recently gathered farmers’ organisations and Felleskjøpet for an emergency meeting to discuss the issue, calling it “a serious situation”, vowing to follow developments closely in the autumn.

The bad summer has also affected chip-lovers, with potato farmers reporting severe soil erosion.

Producers Kims and Maarud say stocks are beginning to run low. This year’s supply of potatoes has to last until next June, and the companies are concerned for long-term standards.

“Rain and wind have washed away the earth covering the potatoes. Access to light makes potatoes green, in other words, makes their quality poor. Other potatoes have been under water too long and have become rotten. The farmers can’t even get onto the fields,” says Kims factory head Jens Kristian Ulsrud.



Published on Friday, 23rd September, 2011 at 13:23 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 23rd September 2011 at 16:26.

This post has the following tags: wetnorwegiansummer, cornproblems, potatofarmers.





  
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