‘Relax Arctic ambitions’, Greenpeace Norway says / News / The Foreigner

‘Relax Arctic ambitions’, Greenpeace Norway says. Human and environmental costs for drilling in the Arctic are too high. Donning polar bear costumes, Greenpeace volunteers protested against Statoil this week. Two representatives climbed up and boarded the West Hercules rig, Wednesday. The facility is currently at a yard in Western Norway’s Ølen undergoing preparation and winterisation. It is scheduled to drill for Statoil in the Barents Sea as part of its major Arctic drilling campaign.

arcticdrilling, statoil, norwayenvironment



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

‘Relax Arctic ambitions’, Greenpeace Norway says

Published on Friday, 12th April, 2013 at 07:42 under the news category, by Shruti Chauhan.

Human and environmental costs for drilling in the Arctic are too high. Donning polar bear costumes, Greenpeace volunteers protested against Statoil this week.

Arctic icebergs
Arctic icebergs
Photo: Polar Cruises/Flickr


Two representatives climbed up and boarded the West Hercules rig, Wednesday. The facility is currently at a yard in Western Norway’s Ølen undergoing preparation and winterisation.

It is scheduled to drill for Statoil in the Barents Sea as part of its major Arctic drilling campaign.

West Hercules was to travel on to the Hoop area to drill up to three wells there this summer after drilling four wells at discoveries Skrugard and Havis. This has now been pushed back to next year, Stavanger Aftenblad has reported.

“For now they have postponed their plans because they had a very broad plan and not the right technology. Our agenda is to break up the partnership between [Russian] Rosneft and Statoil and discourage any future plans of drilling in the Arctic,” Truls Gulowsen, head of Greenpeace Norway, tells The Foreigner.

He spells out three dangers of oil activities in the region, explaining why the organization constantly discourages drilling there.

“Firstly, there is no ready technology to clean up the oil spill from the ice, and hence disaster is waiting to strike.”

“It’s also neither a comfortable nor safe place to station humans. The weather conditions are uncertain, it’s cold and dark, and no helicopters or ships can rescue personnel on rigs there in case of an emergency,” he adds, citing December 2011’s Kolskoya jack-up rig disaster.

53 people died when the rig overturned and sank in the course of 20 minutes in the Sea of Okhotsk off the eastern coast of Russia. The remaining 14 personnel were picked up from the sea.

“Lastly the cost of drilling in such conditions is huge. We are talking about the unfeasibility of such projects where costs are huge and returns not guaranteed,” says Mr Gulowsen.

Greenpeace is also trying to talk the Russian government into tightening its regulations about drilling in the Arctic.

“The same companies which have been pushed to think about drilling in the Arctic region here in Norway are now looking at the region in Russia because of the absence of strict regulations. So we are trying to talk to the Russian government to remedy the situation,” he explains.

Mr Gulowsen is positive about the impact the environmental organization will have on oil companies’ future plans with regards to drilling in the vulnerable region.

“So far, Shell has postponed its drilling plans indefinitely, Statoil has put it off until next year, and even ConocoPhillips has agreed to set aside their drilling-in-the-Arctic plans.”

“All we at Greenpeace want is for these oil companies to relax their ambitions with regards to the Arctic and look at it from our point of view and understand both the material and natural costs attached to such projects both material and natural,” he concludes.



Published on Friday, 12th April, 2013 at 07:42 under the news category, by Shruti Chauhan.

This post has the following tags: arcticdrilling, statoil, norwayenvironment.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!