Reliant Robin rides the Norwegian roads / News / The Foreigner

Reliant Robin rides the Norwegian roads. UPDATED: Norway buyers who want to secure themselves a piece of British car history can now buy one online. The 1975 model’s present owner is selling the Møre og Romsdal County Molde-based motor for NOK 45,000 (some GBP 4,470 at today’s ROE) on advertising website finn.no. According to the advert, the manual blue three-wheeler has done 99,999 kilometres (about 62,136 miles), is fitted with an 850cc petrol-driven engine, and is a RHD.

norwaycars, norwayroads



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Reliant Robin rides the Norwegian roads

Published on Monday, 9th December, 2013 at 09:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 9th December 2013 at 16:53.

UPDATED: Norway buyers who want to secure themselves a piece of British car history can now buy one online.

Mr Seth's Reliant Robin
'I've always been interested in small, peculiar cars,' explained Mr Seth.Mr Seth's Reliant Robin
Photo: By kind permission of Geir Seth


The 1975 model’s present owner is selling the Møre og Romsdal County Molde-based motor for NOK 45,000 (some GBP 4,470 at today’s ROE) on advertising website finn.no.

According to the advert, the manual blue three-wheeler has done 99,999 kilometres (about 62,136 miles), is fitted with an 850cc petrol-driven engine, and is a RHD.

The brakes are fitted with new pipes and lines, with new seals in the cylinders. The tie rods and kingpins are also new.

For people wanting “a vintage car without having to be bothered about rust”, the glass fibre-bodied “object for restoration might be the option” for you, states the advert. It has had 10,000 views since being put out about a week ago.

“An acquaintance of mine bought the car and rang me out of the blue about four to five years ago asking if I wanted to buy it”, seller Geir Seth told The Foreigner, “he had just had it standing around.”

Mr Seth added his interest for buying classic cars has spanned many years. He has spent the last 30 looking for a particular one, which he now has.

'This is why the car is being sold,' Mr Seth said
'This is why the car is being sold,' Mr Seth said
By kind permission of Geir Seth
“I drove a Messerschmitt KR200 a lot in the 90s, and have always been interested in small, peculiar cars. But I now own a Chevrolet Corvair.”

Car manufacturer Reliant was based in Tamworth in Staffordshire. The market town is about 14 miles (some 23 kilometres) north of Birmingham city centre.

They started making the Robin in 1973, with the last rolling off the production line about eight years later. Greek manufacturer MEBEA also produced it under licence from 1974-8.

Reliant then brought the Robin name back in 1989, making a vehicle with increased engine power. Its design was revamped again some 10 years later, with production ceasing permanently in 2001.

Although Reliant produced 65 Special Edition ones in 1999 with a walnut interior, leather trim, and numbered plaque, the Robin became the butt of many jokes.

A Robin appeared in TV series ‘Mr Bean’ (Rowan Atkinson). A yellow-coloured one also appeared in UK TV sitcom ‘Only Fools and Horses’ with actors David Jason and Nicholas Lyndhust –playing Derek ‘Del Boy’ Trotter and Rodney Trotter, respectively.

TV programme ‘Top Gear’ presenter Jeremy Clarkson also brought his brand of driving to the Reliant Robin in Series 15, Episode 1. A survey named the car the worst British car of all time.

So what’s the story behind this Reliant Robin, how did it get to Norway, then?

“The sister of the person I bought from is living in the UK and is married to an Englishman. Her brother was put on the case to try and find one at the end of the 90s,” said Geir Seth.

“He [the acquaintance I bought it from] brought it back to Norway on a car trailer behind his vehicle. It was an interest in Mr Bean which started the whole thing,” Mr Seth concluded.



Published on Monday, 9th December, 2013 at 09:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 9th December 2013 at 16:53.

This post has the following tags: norwaycars, norwayroads.





  
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