Researcher fears higher Norwegian CO2 emissions / News / The Foreigner

Researcher fears higher Norwegian CO2 emissions. Norwegian gas exports could contribute to global warming if demand falls on the European market. A 30 percent decline would mean Norway’s indirect CO2 emissions would double, a new report from the Institute for Futures Studies in Copenhagen (IFF) reveals. ”This creates a situation where lack of investments in the Norwegian Shelf actually increases global CO2 emissions,” says IFF researcher Martin Kruse.

co2, emissions, climate, gases, norway, oil, gas, environment, norwegian, industry, association, gro, braekken, institute, futures, studies, copenhagen, martin, kruse



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Researcher fears higher Norwegian CO2 emissions

Published on Friday, 22nd October, 2010 at 12:39 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Norwegian gas exports could contribute to global warming if demand falls on the European market.

Statfjord A (Illus, photo)
Statfjord A (Illus, photo)
Photo: Marcus Roos/Wikimedia Commons


Russian roulette?       

A 30 percent decline would mean Norway’s indirect CO2 emissions would double, a new report from the Institute for Futures Studies in Copenhagen (IFF) reveals.

”This creates a situation where lack of investments in the Norwegian Shelf actually increases global CO2 emissions,” says IFF researcher Martin Kruse.

Kruse fears a reduction in Norwegian gas production would mean European imports of gas from Russia, whose official policy is to rely more on coal-based production. He suggests more cooperation with Europe to help solve the problem instead.

“If Norway really wants to reduce CO2 emissions, then the reduction must go hand in hand with a European transition to more green energy.”

Provincialism                              

The IFF report was commissioned by the Norwegian Oil Industry Association (OLF), and uses four scenarios to outline the future of Norwegian petroleum exports and society.

OLF Director General Gro Brækken believes Norway’s narrow focus on reducing CO2 is part of the problem, rather than the solution.

”Some want to reduce the activity on the Norwegian Shelf, but this could quickly have negative consequences for the global CO2 emissions. The Norwegian climate debate often becomes too introspective and disconnected from the global perspective. We must not focus on marginal measures at home to the extent that we ignore the need for a far more active international strategy,” she says in a press release.

A drop in the ocean

Norway’s greenhouse gas emissions increased by half a million tons annually between 2000 and 2007. China’s increased by 442.85 million tons in the same period, according to Martin Kruse.

He claims more investment in the Norwegian oil and gas industry is necessary to avoid future negative effects on the climate.  

 “There is a risk of the petroleum industry becoming a hostage in the Norwegian debate on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The fact is that a decision to invest less in the Norwegian petroleum industry could result in higher global CO2 emissions,” says Kruse.




Published on Friday, 22nd October, 2010 at 12:39 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: co2, emissions, climate, gases, norway, oil, gas, environment, norwegian, industry, association, gro, braekken, institute, futures, studies, copenhagen, martin, kruse.





  
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