Researchers advocate earlier births to counteract declining fertility / News / The Foreigner

Researchers advocate earlier births to counteract declining fertility. Women in Norway are having fewer children later in life, research suggests. Experts feel they should be younger amongst declining fertility figures. In the 1990’s the average age was 26, in the 2000’s it was 27 and last year it had increased to 28.4. In Oslo, women are 31.9 years old when they have their first child on average. Fertility rates have declined in the last two years. Professor Dag Bratlid from St. Olav’s Hospital told Aftenposten that women should be encouraged to have children younger to help the population.

norwayfertilityrates, youngerpregnancies



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Researchers advocate earlier births to counteract declining fertility

Published on Tuesday, 5th June, 2012 at 08:56 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 5th June 2012 at 10:44.

Women in Norway are having fewer children later in life, research suggests. Experts feel they should be younger amongst declining fertility figures.

A pregnant woman (illus. ph.)
A pregnant woman (illus. ph.)
Photo: Molly/Flickr


In the 1990’s the average age was 26, in the 2000’s it was 27 and last year it had increased to 28.4. In Oslo, women are 31.9 years old when they have their first child on average. Fertility rates have declined in the last two years.

Professor Dag Bratlid from St. Olav’s Hospital told Aftenposten that women should be encouraged to have children younger to help the population.

He stated that Norway should not depend on immigration and increased life expectancy to sustain the population.

“I think we should have a birth rate that keeps the population reasonably stable. It should be at 2.1. It’s about us being able to take care of the next generations,” he said.

University of Oslo professor Anne Eskild supports Bratlid, stating that it was best for the body to have children younger.

“We should encourage women to have children earlier. For example, it is biologically very beneficial. One can avoid more complications including miscarriage, preeclampsia and a caesarean section.”

28 year old Mari Markmann made the decision to have her first child at the age of 25, she then had her second child two months ago.

“I wanted to start early because then I will have a lot left of my career when I have finished having children.”

Norway has been voted the best country for mothers for a third year in a row.



Published on Tuesday, 5th June, 2012 at 08:56 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 5th June 2012 at 10:44.

This post has the following tags: norwayfertilityrates, youngerpregnancies.





  
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