Researchers chart Norwegians’ labour intensiveness / News / The Foreigner

Researchers chart Norwegians’ labour intensiveness. Norwegians are the fourth hardest working in Europe, according to a recent Danish survey. While Latvians, Lithuanians and Estonians beat Norway, researcher Kristine Nergaard at Norway’s FAFO told Dagsavisen she believes Norwegians are high on the list because, “labour force participation in Norway is high compared with other countries, especially for women, but also among men.” “We also have high labour force participation among older workers, those over 55 years of age. Moreover, unemployment is low, something which also means more people are at work.”

norwaywork, norwegianemployment, worklevelsnorway



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Researchers chart Norwegians’ labour intensiveness

Published on Friday, 20th July, 2012 at 12:59 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Norwegians are the fourth hardest working in Europe, according to a recent Danish survey.

Overworked
Overworked
Photo: Suzanne Tucker/Shutterstock Images


While Latvians, Lithuanians and Estonians beat Norway, researcher Kristine Nergaard at Norway’s FAFO told Dagsavisen she believes Norwegians are high on the list because, “labour force participation in Norway is high compared with other countries, especially for women, but also among men.”

“We also have high labour force participation among older workers, those over 55 years of age. Moreover, unemployment is low, something which also means more people are at work.”

Researchers calculated the amount of hours all nationalities involved in the study worked on average every day of the year.

Taking account of different work patterns including overtime, time in lieu, and statutory sick pay days, results showed Norwegians work an average of 3.3 hours. Latvia came out on top with an average of 4.1.

“Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia rank highest can have something to do with the fact that they are obligated to work longer there,” Kristine Nergaard added, pointing out the lower-than-average European wage scales.

The Rockwool Foundation survey, which looked at people aged between 20 and 74, also showed that Germans and Belgians worked the least.

Sweden was not included in the study, Dagsavisen's article points out.



Published on Friday, 20th July, 2012 at 12:59 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: norwaywork, norwegianemployment, worklevelsnorway.





  
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