Road Traffic Centre tackles the troubles / News / The Foreigner

Road Traffic Centre tackles the troubles. Most calls received by the Road Traffic Centre are from people with all kinds of problems, a Norwegian Public Roads Administration advisor explains. “We once got a call from someone who was tired of sheep on the road and told us he had caught one. He wanted to find the owner but we could not do anything because they were allowed to graze there. He sounded quite tired”, Lena Sjøvold tells to NRK. According to her, many Norwegian motorists call 175 to complain about obstructions too, such as things that have fallen from other vehicles, and especially frost-damaged (telehiv) roads, or those affected by heavy snow and avalanches.

norwegianpublicroadsadministration, motoristtroubles



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Road Traffic Centre tackles the troubles

Published on Tuesday, 20th September, 2011 at 10:41 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.

Most calls received by the Road Traffic Centre are from people with all kinds of problems, a Norwegian Public Roads Administration advisor explains.

E6 Okstadbakken (illustration photo)
E6 Okstadbakken (illustration photo)
Photo: Knut Opeide, Statens vegvesen/Flickr


“We once got a call from someone who was tired of sheep on the road and told us he had caught one. He wanted to find the owner but we could not do anything because they were allowed to graze there. He sounded quite tired”, Lena Sjøvold tells to NRK.

According to her, many Norwegian motorists call 175 to complain about obstructions too, such as things that have fallen from other vehicles, and especially frost-damaged (telehiv) roads, or those affected by heavy snow and avalanches.

“Many of the callers are professional drivers. The road is their work, so they often have both tips and advice to give”, she says, “but some of the calls are just to chat, especially from people who are on their way northwards, telling us about weather and road conditions, and where they are. They just like to keep the line busy for a while.

Ms Sjøvold admits, however, the strange phone calls are really those that make their day more interesting.

“On one occasion, a woman rang from the emergency phone at the bottom of the undersea tunnel Frøyatunnelen, saying her husband had left her there following an argument. She didn’t know what to do,” says Ms Sjøvold.



Published on Tuesday, 20th September, 2011 at 10:41 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.

This post has the following tags: norwegianpublicroadsadministration, motoristtroubles.





  
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