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Roadside bomb just the start. “There’ll be further losses in Afghanistan,” security expert says. Whilst the Norwegian military mourn the loss of one of their own, Halvor Hartz, a leading security expert, advises them to prepare for even tougher times ahead.No help Hartz says there’s now an increased risk to Norwegian troops in Northern Afghanistan.

claes, joachim, olsson, norwegian, army, soldier, killed, afghanistan, telemark, battalion, gressvik, fredrikstad, oestfold, bomb, maymaneh, ghowrmach, faryab, kabul



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Roadside bomb just the start

Published on Tuesday, 26th January, 2010 at 11:49 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

“There’ll be further losses in Afghanistan,” security expert says.

Claes Joachim Olsson
Claes Joachim Olsson
Photo: Norwegian military/Forsvaret


Whilst the Norwegian military mourn the loss of one of their own, Halvor Hartz, a leading security expert, advises them to prepare for even tougher times ahead.

No help

Hartz says there’s now an increased risk to Norwegian troops in Northern Afghanistan.

“The military must be prepared for a higher number of losses than before,” he tells NRK.

Norwegian authorities have deployed the country’s troops in the north in order to avoid heavy losses, as fierce battles have traditionally raged in the south.

However, recruitment to the resistance has increased recently because of growing mistrust to central leaders in Kabul country-wide.

“The grounds for recruitment have probably mushroomed, because it’s been such a long time since the ordinary man in the street has seen any positive changes,” says Hartz.

Repeated confrontations

Norwegian troops first went in to the Ghowrmach-district in November 2007, and have been engaged in several battles since; taking fire from resistance fighters armed with automatic weapons and rocket launchers on repeated occasions.

According to Helge Lurås, a researcher at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI), many of the fighters killed by the Norwegian army came from Ghowrmach, and were behind attacks launched in Faryab.

As a result, Norway asked to be placed in charge of Ghowrmach, and had the district transferred to Faryab.

Mourning

Meanwhile, yesterday’s tragic death of Claes Joachim Olsson, the 22 year-old soldier killed by a Taliban-planted roadside bomb outside Ghowrmach, has hit both the military and the dead soldier’s local community hard.

“Losing one of our soldiers is one of the worst things that can happen. Olsson was a skilled soldier that we now mourn,” Rear Admiral Trond Grytting, Acting Chief of the military’s operational headquarters in Reitan, writes in a press release.

“I send my heartfelt condolences to his friends and family,” says Eva Kristin Andersen, the mayor of Fredrikstad – a town near the village of Gressvik in Østfold where Olsson came from.

Last night, friends and colleagues held a memorial service for Olsson at Rena military camp, where the fallen Telemark Battalion soldier worked.



Published on Tuesday, 26th January, 2010 at 11:49 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: claes, joachim, olsson, norwegian, army, soldier, killed, afghanistan, telemark, battalion, gressvik, fredrikstad, oestfold, bomb, maymaneh, ghowrmach, faryab, kabul.





  
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