Rodents ruining Norway vehicles / News / The Foreigner

Rodents ruining Norway vehicles. Cars in Southern Norway’s Kristiansand are currently under attack from small furry creatures (article not for the squeamish). The mice, that have eroded electronics and munched motors, are causing major damage. “We’ve seen major damage to vehicles caused by mice this year. Things are hectic right now,” said Jan Inge Åsland, owner of Kristiansand-based company Tinnheia bil.

cars, mice, norway, repairs



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Rodents ruining Norway vehicles

Published on Wednesday, 5th November, 2014 at 10:04 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last Updated on 5th November 2014 at 10:17.

Cars in Southern Norway’s Kristiansand are currently under attack from small furry creatures (article not for the squeamish).

A baby mouse
One of these in your vehicle can lead to exorbitant repair costs.A baby mouse
Photo: Nick Harris//Flickr


The mice, that have eroded electronics and munched motors, are causing major damage.

“We’ve seen major damage to vehicles caused by mice this year. Things are hectic right now,” said Jan Inge Åsland, owner of Kristiansand-based company Tinnheia bil.

One vehicle owner has also told broadcaster NRK that he had to put a mousetrap underneath the bonnet.

Experts say 2014 is an extreme year for mice, with several hundredfold more than normal in southern Norway.

The increase can be seen regarding the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), field vole (Microtus agrestis), and wood lemming (Myopus schisticolor).

One mouse can make up to 15,000 babies in one year. These could be nesting in the vehicle, needing an average of 6 millimetres (some 0.2 inches) to get into small places.

(Sewer rats can shrink their body, needing just 1 centimetre (about 0.4 inches) to get past obstructions).

The average adult mouse weighs between 30-90 grams (approximately 1-3 ounces), measuring up to 8 inches long (about 20 centimetres) including the 3-4 inch tail (some 7-10 centimetres).

Rodents need to constantly gnaw on hard things, otherwise their teeth grow uneven. This can lead to malnourishment.

Moreover, they maintain their teeth at the driver’s expense. Mice can destroy a car’s entire wiring system overnight. The costs of repairing the car can be expensive, with the vehicle unrepairable in some cases.

An article published in Burnaby NewsLeader earlier this year revealed that mechanics in Canada had seen an increase in cases of mice damaging vehicles.

"So what happens is they would sit on the exhaust pipe, which is warm, and they would chew on that one. From there they carry on until they reach other parts of the car, such as the engine compartment.”  Nick Acimavic, co-owner of Firestone Burnaby informed the British Columbia-based publication.

Tips for avoiding a similar situation with your own car mouse:

  • Avoid parking in areas with known rodent problems.
  • Park on the pavement, rather than in the woods or areas with long grass when possible.
  • Remove any food sources from the vehicle.
  • Set rodent traps and use sound-based repellent devices.


Published on Wednesday, 5th November, 2014 at 10:04 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last updated on 5th November 2014 at 10:17.

This post has the following tags: cars, mice, norway, repairs.





  
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