Scandinavian airlines dump paraffin for cooking oil / News / The Foreigner

Scandinavian airlines dump paraffin for cooking oil. SAS and Norwegian pilot greener fuel in Norway and Sweden to reduce CO2 emissions. Delays are expected. Scandinavian Airlines has made two flights recently using biofuel. Tuesday saw the Trondheim Værnes-Oslo Gardermoen SK371 route served by a plane using 48 per cent biofuel made from organic leftovers in certified JET A-1.

flights, planes, travel, norway



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Scandinavian airlines dump paraffin for cooking oil

Published on Thursday, 13th November, 2014 at 10:28 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Sarah Bostock   .
Last Updated on 13th November 2014 at 10:41.

SAS and Norwegian pilot greener fuel in Norway and Sweden to reduce CO2 emissions. Delays are expected.

Landing lights
Airlines are hoping to go green and for descending costs.Landing lights
Photo: Richard Hoare/Geograph.co.uk


Scandinavian Airlines has made two flights recently using biofuel.

Tuesday saw the Trondheim Værnes-Oslo Gardermoen SK371 route served by a plane using 48 per cent biofuel made from organic leftovers in certified JET A-1.

The green initiative was carried out in cooperation with Norway airport operator Avinor to coincide with this week’s ZERO Emission Conference held in Oslo.

Wafting through the air

SAS hopes to be able to use biofuel in flights in Norway from 2015.

On 7th November, SAS in Sweden flew from Stockholm’s Arlanda Airport to Östersund Airport (SK2064).

The aircraft tanks contained the same JET A-1 fuel blend with 10 per cent based on re-used cooking oil.

Statoil Aviation and SkyNRG distributed and delivered the biofuel.

Low-priced airline Norwegian also intends to use biofuel in attempts for greener commercial passenger flights.

An aircraft flew the Bergen-Oslo route on 11th November with almost 50 per cent re-used cooking oil-based biofuel in the tanks.

One of the passengers on board DY631 was Norway’s Minister of Climate and Environment Tine Sundtoft.

According to Norwegian, the emissions are 40 per cent lower than an average flight using regular aircraft fuel.

These were 40 grams per passenger kilometer (3,178 kg total) instead of 74 grams per passenger kilometre on the same stretch (a total of 5,786 kg).

A bad taste                        

In March this year, airport operator Avinor announced that it would contribute up to NOK 100m (about USD 14.72m at today’s ROE) over a 10-year period to help support the development of a national aviation biofuel sector.

“Over the last few years, Avinor has led the Norwegian aviation industry’s investigation of opportunities to produce aviation biofuel from Norwegian timber, and we have deployed considerable resources in this work,” said Dag Falk-Petersen, CEO of Avinor.

The company also wants to examine the possibility of introducing an extra tax on flights to finance biofuels use at Norwegian airports.

Airlines do not favour Avinor’s idea. Biofuel also currently costs two to three times that of traditional JET A-1.

“It [introducing an extra tax] is a bad idea,” stated SAS’ Ove Myrold.

Moreover, the Scandinavian airline is planning to buy just a small volume of biofuels next year, according to Dagens Næringsliv.

Norwegian information manager Lasse Sandaker-Nilsen told the business publication that the company “has not committed itself to purchasing biofuels in 2015. The price is far too high and availability too low for that.”

What’s cooking                                                          

Meanwhile, today sees the start of a major re-organisation of approach procedures. It will also result in new flight routes to and from 16 airports in south-western Norway, while ensuring continued flight safety.

The move, which is the largest-ever re-organisation of airspace in Norway, is designed to increase air traffic capacity and safety. It will also allow somewhat greener travel.

Instead of decreasing altitude in stages, the new procedures will mean aircraft can fly a so-termed cruise descent on approach to the runway.

This flight technique requires less engine power, consequently reducing how much fuel is used, as well as emissions.

But passengers can expect delays until the new system is properly in place. This is because of restrictions on take-offs and landings at Norwegian airports.

The delays, which Avinor says are expected to gradually decrease in scope, will also affect helicopter traffic to and from the North Sea.

At the same time, Avinor says it is “working closely with airlines to minimise the consequences for passengers as much as possible.”

The 16 airports getting new approach and departure routes are:

  • Bergen Flesland
  • Florø
  • Førde Bringeland
  • Haugesund Karmøy
  • Kristiansand Kjevik
  • Kristiansund Kvernberget
  • Molde Årø
  • Røros
  • Sandane Anda
  • Sogndal
  • Stord Sørstokken
  • Stavanger Sola
  • Trondheim Værnes
  • Ørland
  • Ørsta-Volda/Hovden
  • Ålesund Vigra


Published on Thursday, 13th November, 2014 at 10:28 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Sarah Bostock   .
Last updated on 13th November 2014 at 10:41.

This post has the following tags: flights, planes, travel, norway.





  
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