Scandinavians rebuff oddity focus / News / The Foreigner

Scandinavians rebuff oddity focus. The world press curiosity fire about Norwegian wood may be gradually dwindling, but there is nothing novel about parents sipping lattes while allowing their children to nap in their pram. The British broadcaster chose to focus on what it regarded as a peculiarly Scandinavian phenomenon last week in its report ‘the babies who nap in sub-zero temperatures’. “There’s nothing new in the article from BBC, and we’ve never thought about it,” Michael, father of two girls aged four months and three years tells The Foreigner.

norwaybabies, outsidesleeping



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Scandinavians rebuff oddity focus

Published on Monday, 25th February, 2013 at 16:07 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.
Last Updated on 25th February 2013 at 17:49.

The world press curiosity fire about Norwegian wood may be gradually dwindling, but there is nothing novel about parents sipping lattes while allowing their children to nap in their pram.

Lovin' the pram
Lovin' the pram
Photo: Sellers Patton/Flickr


The British broadcaster chose to focus on what it regarded as a peculiarly Scandinavian phenomenon last week in its report ‘the babies who nap in sub-zero temperatures’.

“There’s nothing new in the article from BBC, and we’ve never thought about it,” Michael, father of two girls aged four months and three years tells The Foreigner.

Children who attend day care in Norway sleep outside for between 20 and 60 minutes during the winter.

Norwegians grow up with knowledge about how to dress in the cold and use layers with wool next to the skin.

Soft wool that does not itch is popular among Norwegians who spend a lot of money on babies clothes made of 100-percent merino wool.

Magazine Foreldre & barn (Parents & Children) have also had several articles on the issue in the past, as Norwegian parents are very protective of their children.

In the same way children are administered UV-protection before going out in the sun, cold cream without water is applied to babies’ cheeks, nose and ears before sleeping or playing outside in the cold. The reason for waterless cold cream is that H2O may cause damage to the skin.

Most parents also put too many rather than too few clothes on their children, and also know that a wet nappy might deplete body temperature.

Institution-wise, day care staff does not usually allow children to sleep outside when temperature is below –10C.

Moreover, municipal health centre personnel do not recommend children to sleep outside when it is windy or humid as such conditions may be dangerous.

Mountain climbers know all about damage to extremities. They could experience gangrene, a life-threatening condition, and something that Norwegians are aware of from childhood.

An online search also reveals that even Norwegian health-workers may be hesitant One also based in the Norwegian capital has recommended parents cancel their daily walk outside when temperatures are getting too low.

“Babies should absolutely be kept inside.”

According to Michael, parents from warmer countries are more reluctant to letting their children sleep outside. His children attended a day car in Oslo with a high number of children born to immigrants.

“I remember that Nathalie slept better outside when she was two years old, but she was just one of few. A high percentage of foreign parents were skeptical and didn’t let their children do this,” he says.




Published on Monday, 25th February, 2013 at 16:07 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.
Last updated on 25th February 2013 at 17:49.

This post has the following tags: norwaybabies, outsidesleeping.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!